News | September 07, 2008

Cardiolite Highlights Role in Molecular Breast Imaging Trial

September 7, 2008 - Cardiolite (Kit for the Preparation of Technetium Tc99m Sestamibi for Injection) by Lantheus Medical Imaging will be featured in a new study on molecular breast imaging being presented on Sunday, Sept. 7 2008, the company announced at the American Society of Clinical Oncology’s 2008 Breast Cancer Symposium in Washington, D.C.

Cardiolite, formerly marketed as Miraluma for the breast cancer imaging indication, is FDA approved for planar imaging as a second line diagnostic drug after mammography to assist in the evaluation of breast lesions in patients with an abnormal mammogram or a palpable breast mass. Cardiolite is not indicated for breast cancer screening, or to confirm the presence or absence of a malignancy, or in place of a mammogram, and it is not an alternative to biopsy. This imaging test is used to assist in the evaluation of breast lesions in some women who have had an abnormal mammogram, or who have a palpable breast mass. In this test, a woman receives an injection of a small amount of a short-lived radioactive substance called Cardiolite, which is taken up by cancer cells, and a gamma camera is used to obtain images of the breasts.

“This promising new study on molecular breast imaging provides encouraging data for millions of women and families who are impacted by breast cancer and sheds light on potential new diagnostic approaches for finding tumors in women who have dense breast tissue, which can confound mammograms,” stated Don Kiepert, president and chief executive officer of Lantheus Medical Imaging. “We are proud to supply the imaging agent for this important clinical effort. Breast cancer is a devastating disease and we recognize how important and valuable early detection is for women.”

For more information: www.lantheus.com

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