News | June 24, 2007

CAD for Breast Ultrasound is Efficient, Reimbursable

June 25, 2007 - The Mammography and Ultrasound Specialists (MUS) of Houston, TX, recently announced the installation of Medipattern’s B-CAD, finding that the system procedure saves time and generates a more thorough record of the diagnostic breast ultrasound procedure, improving consistency from reader to reader and reportedly providing an additional revenue stream.

The images saved during a typical examination are sent via DICOM to the CAD module located on the network where they are analyzed. The user initiates CAD to look through the image using morphology to find the lesion boundary. CAD uses standard imaging techniques to determine the size, shape and orientation of each lesion at a deeper level than can be displayed on screen.

CAD discerns subtle detail within the matrix of solid nodules that provides increased confidence about the feature analyzed. The CAD software allows the user to automatically report the classification of features within the lesion using the BI-RADS lexicon. The software displays images of the lesions saved during the exam, images of the segmented lesions analyzed, and a list of the BI-RADS descriptors for each lesion combining those that have been found to apply to the lesion automatically and the ones checked by the user. The physician can then edit the report to reflect the final interpretation. A complete report is generated including the BI-RADS listing of each feature and BI-RADS score. All information is automatically compiled into a natural language report, including the physician’s findings and recommendations, which can be printed or saved electronically.

For more information: www.medipattern.com

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