News | Patient Positioning Radiation Therapy | October 25, 2018

Brainlab Introduces ExacTrac Dynamic at ASTRO 2018

Radiotherapy patient positioning and monitoring technology now consolidates multiple spatial tracking technologies

Brainlab Introduces ExacTrac Dynamic at ASTRO 2018
Radiotherapy patient positioning and monitoring technology now consolidates multiple spatial tracking technologies

October 25, 2018 — Brainlab unveiled ExacTrac Dynamic at the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) meeting, Oct. 21-24 in San Antonio, Texas. This concept for radiotherapy patient positioning and monitoring offers value on multiple fronts, including expanded clinical indications, broad technological advancements, enhanced user and patient experience, and technology consolidation. ExacTrac Dynamic is the next generation of ExacTrac X-Ray, Brainlab’s positioning and monitoring solution for radiotherapy treatments.

ExacTrac Dynamic addresses a full range of patient positioning and monitoring requirements that heretofore have been achieved, in most cases, by employing multiple systems combined with different internal tracking and surface scanning technologies. ExacTrac Dynamic is seamlessly integrated with a wide range of high-end linear accelerators and designed to deliver high-precision tracking and verification, while addressing the challenges associated with treating moving targets. All of these are critical requirements for delivering extremely effective and high doses in precision radiotherapy.

“We had the opportunity to be the first institution to enter into a strategic partnership for the development of ExacTrac Dynamic, as we were looking for a technology that could become the new standard for patient positioning and monitoring in Copenhagen,” commented Lars Dahl Allerup, new business development manager, corporate procurement, Capital Region of Denmark. “As a long standing partner of Brainlab, we have always been convinced of the superior performance of ExacTrac X-Ray for cranial treatments. What is important for us moving forward is to source technology like ExacTrac Dynamic that allows us to continue treating cranial indications but also take care of the larger patient population at the Herlev Hospital and Rigshospitalet, with a platform redesigned to monitor all external beam treatment indications.”

New high-speed surface tracking incorporates 300,000 3-D surface points to externally monitor patient position and detect movement during treatment. Each of the surface points acquired by the ExacTrac Dynamic structured light system are matched to a heat signal generated by a thermal camera, creating another dimension in which to track the patient’s position consistently and with great accuracy. The advanced surface tracking with ExacTrac Dynamic is not impacted by room lighting, reflections or skin tone, and has very low latency.

Internal motion caused by normal respiration must be addressed to ensure safe and effective treatments. In addition to external tracking, integrated X-ray monitoring with ExacTrac Dynamic verifies the patient’s position internally with real-time imaging, at any treatment position. The system offers ways to monitor clinical indications that are complicated by internal motion with additional workflows, such as deep inspiration breath hold and internal anatomy verification, providing confidence in true dose sparing of critical anatomy.

Customers will still take advantage of ExacTrac X-ray’s historical benefits, including high performance, non-coplanar capabilities and submillimetric precision. Cranial positioning and monitoring offers streamlined immobilization, non-coplanar imaging, Mu-triggered monitoring and gantry-angle triggered monitoring.

ExacTrac Dynamic simplifies frameless fixation with three moldable thermoplastic mask options designed with patient comfort in mind. Deep integration with linear accelerators from both Elekta and Varian Medical Systems allow positioning and monitoring workflows to function seamlessly, including automatic patient loading, gantry triggered imaging and automated beam-hold.

For more information: www.brainlab.com

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