News | Contrast Media | July 17, 2017

ACR Offers Revised Contrast Media in Imaging Manual

Latest version offers new chapter on contrast-enhanced ultrasound, updates on patient selection and preparation strategies, and more

ACR Offers Revised Contrast Media in Imaging Manual

July 17, 2017 — The American College of Radiology (ACR) recently revised its authoritative guide for the safe and effective use of contrast media.

“Changes in technology and available scientific evidence prompted the updates in this practical reference,” said James H. Ellis, M.D., FACR, outgoing chair of the ACR Committee on Drugs and Contrast Media.

“The latest version of the manual incorporates multiple practical changes that immediately should improve the practice of radiology by groups who follow these guidelines,” said Matthew S. Davenport, M.D., FSAR, FSCBTMR, incoming chair.

The revised manual has updated chapters on:

  • Patient selection and preparation strategies;
  • Administering contrast media to pregnant or potentially pregnant patients;
  • Use of gadolinium-based contrast media in patients with normal and impaired renal function; and
  • There is also a new chapter addressing contrast-enhanced ultrasound.

The Manual on Contrast Media is available at no charge on the ACR website.

For more information: www.acr.org 

Related Content

The Global Contrast Injectors Market will grow by $613.47M during 2020-2024, according to Technavio
News | Contrast Media Injectors | June 17, 2020
June 17, 2020 — Technavio has been monitoring the ...
The FDA has approved Lilly’s TAUVID (flortaucipir F 18 injection), a radioactive diagnostic agent, for PET imaging of the brain to estimate the density and distribution of aggregated tau neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) in adult patients with cognitive impairment who are being evaluated for Alzheimer’s disease

Getty Images

News | Contrast Media | June 01, 2020
June 1, 2020 — TAUVID, a radioactive diagnostic agent, has been approved by the FDA for...
Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have surveyed the amount of gadolinium found in river water in Tokyo. Gadolinium is contained in contrast agents given to patients undergoing medical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, and it has been shown in labs to become toxic when exposed to ultraviolet rays. The researchers found significantly elevated levels, particularly near water treatment plants, highlighting the need for new public policy and removal technologies as MRI become even more commonp

Samples were taken along rivers around Tokyo. Measurements of rare earth element quantities indicate a clearly elevated amount of gadolinium compared to that in natural shale. Graphics courtesy of Tokyo Metropolitan University

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | May 26, 2020
May 26, 2020 — Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan...
Gadolinium-based contrast agents

UT Dallas faculty members who collaborated with Dr. Jeremiah Gassensmith (center, back), associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry, include Dr. Lloyd Lumata (left, back), assistant professor of physics, and Dr. Steven Nielsen, associate professor of chemistry. Chemistry graduate students in Gassensmith’s lab include (from left, front) Oliva Brohlin, Arezoo Shahrivarkevishahi and Laurel Hagge.

News | Contrast Media | February 06, 2020
February 6, 2020 — University of Texas at Dallas researchers
This image is of an 80 kg woman with a newly diagnosed IDH-wildtype glioblastoma

This image is of an 80 kg woman with a newly diagnosed IDH-wildtype glioblastoma. The quarter dose image on the left was obtained after the administration of 4 ml of MultiHance. Subsequently, an additional 12 ml of MultiHance was administered and the cumulative full dose image in the center was obtained. The image on the right was rendered following artificial intelligence processing of the 4 ml image using eGad genetic algorithms. This image has the quality of triple dose gadolinium even though only one quarter dose gadolinium was given.

Feature | Contrast Media Injectors | January 30, 2020 | By Matthew Kuhn, M.D., FACR
Gadolinium-based contrast agents (...

Image courtesy of Guerbet

Feature | Contrast Media Injectors | January 30, 2020 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane
Contrast media injector technology has seen several recent advances, such as cutting costs by reducing contrast waste
Gadolinium based contrast dye in brain MRI

Gadolinium contrast agents (GBCAs) are partly retained in the brain, raising safety concerns, as seen in this MRI.

News | Contrast Media | January 17, 2020
January 17, 2020 — Bracco Diagnostics Inc., the U.