News | Contrast Media | February 07, 2018

ACR Introduces New Contrast Reaction Card

Companion to ACR Manual on Contrast Media meant to help improve management of contrast-related adverse events

ACR Introduces New Contrast Reaction Card

February 7, 2018 — The American College of Radiology (ACR) introduced a new contrast reaction card that summarizes important steps to be taken when managing an acute reaction to contrast material.

Offered as an addition to the ACR Manual on Contrast Media, the card outlines multiple common and serious contrast reactions. The free resource also includes details on premedication and extravasations.

"Managing contrast reactions is a necessary, important and stressful part of a radiologist's job. In the heat of the moment it can be difficult to remember critical details like the dose of epinephrine. This card can help improve that process,” said Matthew Davenport, M.D., chair of the American College of Radiology Committee on Drugs and Contrast Media.

The card is about the size of a driver's license. To use in your practice simply:

  • Print the cards;
  • Enter the phone number your health system uses to activate a "CODE BLUE"; and
  • Distribute the cards.

“Of course, no reference card can be a substitute for the sound judgment and expertise of a licensed physician. However, we hope these cards will be a valuable asset in any radiology practice,” said Davenport.

The Contrast Reaction Card is now available for download in both Landscape and Portrait formats.

For more information: www.acr.org

 

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