News | November 02, 2008

ACIST, Nova to Co-Distribute Creatinine Meter

November 3, 2008 - ACIST Medical Systems Inc. (a Bracco Group company), signed a distribution agreement for the StatSensor Creatinine Meter with Nova Biomedical, in which the ACIST and Nova teams will co-exclusively market and distribute the StatSensor Creatinine Meter into the medical fields of radiology and cardiology within North America.

Within this new distribution structure, both ACIST and Nova will focus on providing its customers with continuity for the StatSensor solution from point of care deployment in imaging modalities where iodine- and gadolinium-derived intravenous contrast agents are administered, to platform management and its connectivity into the clinical laboratory.

ACIST will continue to support customers who have previously purchased the StatSensor Creatinine Meter under the E-Z-Chem brand name from E-Z-EM Inc. prior to the acquisition of certain assets by ACIST Medical Systems.

The StatSensor Creatinine device measures a patient's blood creatinine level and calculates their eGFR (estimated glomerular filtration rate) prior to contrast agent administration via a finger prick. Blood creatinine levels and eGFR are key clinical factors, allowing the clinician to assess patient renal function and eligibility for IV contrast administration. The test is designed to minimize the potential for CIN (Contrast Induced Nephropathy), which can include such serious conditions as renal impairment from iodine based contrast to NSF (Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis) from gadolinium based contrast.

For more information: www.acistmedical.com

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