News | May 31, 2007

Siemens Medical Solutions Patient Health Card Enables Secure and Portable Access to Medical Records

June 1, 2007 — In an effort to alleviate preventable medical errors and insurance fraud, Siemens Medical Solutions announces the general availability of the CardOS Health 2.0 Patient Health Card Solution.

This highly portable, secure storage and communication device provides patient identification, electronic retrieval, storage and display of critical medical and demographic data, and communication functions for healthcare information as well as meeting the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's requirements for Class I medical devices that include design, development and manufacturing controls.

"Incomplete medical information is a leading cause of the nearly 100,000 deaths that occur each year due to medical errors in the U.S., and it's estimated that tens of billions of dollars are lost to fraud, including identity theft," said Joe Camaratta, vice president, Global Solutions, Siemens Medical Solutions. "The Siemens Patient Health Card will help streamline workflow for administrators and provide a convenient, secure means to access critical and timely patient data."

About the size of a credit card, Patient Health Cards are chip-embedded, photo identification cards that allow patients to be quickly and accurately identified and authenticated during registration, and provide instant access to key electronic medical record information, including insurance coverage and demographic information. Patients can easily provide the facility with their information by inserting a card into a reader and entering a private identification number to unlock the card.

For patients who are unable to enter their number in an emergency setting, caregivers can override the system in order to access critical information.

The solution combines smart card technology with a comprehensive set of applications that can integrate with hospital information systems. Siemens' solution supports the healthcare industry's initiatives to adopt a universal electronic health record and complements RHIO / NHIN efforts.

The solution has been tested at New York's Mount Sinai Medical Center and Elmhurst Hospital, which plan to deploy approximately 1.2 million Patient Health Cards.

"With Siemens, we are working with one of the world's technology leaders to help improve patient care and provide hospitals with more readily accessible information in a secure and portable format," said Kenneth L. Davis, M.D., president and CEO, Mount Sinai Medical Center. "Whether it is an emergency or routine visit, complete and updated
patient data are vital to help provide appropriate treatment in the most timely fashion. The general availability of the Siemens Patient Health Card is a tremendous step in the pursuit of more accurate, personal and timely healthcare."

For more information visit: www.usa.siemens.com/medical

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