News | Ultrasound Women's Health | March 20, 2019

QTbreasthealth Opens Breast Imaging Center in San Jose

New center brings radiation-free QT ultrasound technology to the region

QTbreasthealth Opens Breast Imaging Center in San Jose

March 20, 2019 — QTbreasthealth has opened a new center in San Jose, Calif. The new location is now open and booking appointments for radiation-free breast imaging.

Due to popular demand for its quantitative transmission ultrasound technology known as the QTscan, QTbreasthealth is in steady growth mode, according to the company. The San Jose location is the fourth center to open in seven months. Other locations include Walnut Creek and Novato, Calif., and Grand Rapids, Mich. Additional locations are planned to open around the country throughout 2019.

As with all QTbreasthealth centers, the San Jose location features the new U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-cleared, radiation-free, 3-D ultrasound breast imaging technology that requires no compression and no injections.

Ongoing clinical trials and published research have found the QTscan to be successful in identifying various types of breast tissue, particularly within dense breasts. Because QTscan technology provides unimpeded visibility for women with dense breast tissue, it is a next step for women who have had a mammogram, but have been notified that they have dense breasts. More than 50 percent of women between 40 and 50 have dense breasts, which have less fat and more connective, fibrous and glandular tissue compared to lower-density breast tissue. Because of higher concentration of glandular tissue, women with dense breasts have higher rates of breast cancer.

QTbreasthealth’s goal is to provide technology that enables women to get scanned as often as necessary, with no risk. San Jose was selected as the new location largely due to the region being labeled an “area of concern” by the California Breast Cancer Mapping Project due to significantly higher rates of breast cancer than the majority of the state.

QTbreasthealth offers a spa-like breast imaging experience, complete with soothing scents, comforting robes and a relaxing imaging scan that some women actually sleep through. Because the QTscan uses no radiation, the exam is available to women of all ages and avoids the frequency limits associated with radiation-based imaging tests. The clear and comprehensive 3-D image delivered by the QTscan makes QTbreasthealth an ideal second opinion for breast imaging, according to the company, providing a more detailed image than mammography or handheld ultrasound.

For more information: www.qtbreasthealth.com

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