News | Mammography | August 14, 2019

Imago Systems Announces Collaboration With Mayo Clinic for Breast Imaging

Mayo Clinic to support clinical trial development and oversee Imago's reader studies for mammography

Imago Systems Announces Collaboration With Mayo Clinic for Breast Imaging

Image courtesy of Imago Systems

August 14, 2019 — Image visualization company Imago Systems announced it has signed a know-how license with Mayo Clinic. The multi-year agreement will focus on clinical trial support for Imago Systems' ICE Reveal product for breast imaging and includes financial investment from Mayo Clinic.

The collaboration will be led by a breast imaging research specialist at Mayo Clinic who will spearhead Imago's pilot and pivotal studies to clinically validate the company’s visual intelligence software as applied to screening mammograms. Mayo Clinic's involvement will play a critical role in the evolution of the technology to improve breast imaging across multiple imaging modalities.

Deaths from breast cancer have topped 40,000 each year, and approximately 40 percent of women in the U.S. have dense breast tissue, which is very difficult to screen accurately with a mammogram alone. This technology, which does not require any additional radiation exposure, has the potential to be a highly effective, and safer, tool in the fight against breast cancer, according to Imago Systems.

Unique to Imago are its intelligent algorithms that "re-visualize" grayscale images, such as mammograms, to create new images that deliver greater levels of information and insight, or Visual Intelligence. This patent-pending technology is designed to increase clinicians' diagnostic confidence across all medical imaging modalities, and will optimize data to improve efforts in developing artificial intelligence, machine learning, drug development and genomics. The company's initial focus is on improvements in mammography and breast health screening.

Mayo Clinic has financial interest in the technology referenced in this press release. Mayo Clinic will use any revenue it receives to support its not-for-profit mission in patient care, education and research.

For more information: www.imagosystems.com

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