Technology | Computed Tomography (CT) | April 13, 2018

FDA Clears Siemens Healthineers' Somatom Force CT With FAST Integrated Workflow

Premium dual source scanner includes FAST 3D Camera for automated, precise, consistent patient positioning

FDA Clears Siemens Healthineers' Somatom Force CT With FAST Integrated Workflow

April 13, 2018 — The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has cleared the latest version of the Somatom Force, the flagship dual-source computed tomography (CT) system from Siemens Healthineers. The system now features the new FAST (Fully Assisting Scanner Technologies) Integrated Workflow, which helps ensure precise patient positioning.

A key component of the FAST Integrated Workflow is the all-new FAST 3-D Camera. The camera fits above the patient table and uses artificial intelligence and deep learning to enable automatic, precise and consistent isocentric positioning of patients. Touch Panels fitted on the gantry allow staff to leverage this automation at the push of a button while remaining close to the patient during scan preparation.

Watch the VIDEO: Computed Tomography (CT) Technology Report, an overview of CT advances by ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr

The updated Somatom Force also offers iterative metal artifact reduction (iMAR), enabling users to significantly reduce artifacts caused by metal implants, artificial joints or pacemakers. Additionally, the improved Image Reconstruction System (IRS) of the system reconstructs up to 70 images per second with iterative reconstruction.

The new FAST Integrated Workflow with the FAST 3-D Camera also will be available with the Somatom Drive dual source CT system. It was already approved on the Somatom Edge Plus in early April.

Read the article "Arterys Receives First FDA Clearance for Oncology Imaging Suite With Deep Learning"

Read the article "Planmed Launches Improved Planmed Verity CBCT Scanner"

For more information: www.usa.healthcare.siemens.com

 

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