Technology | Radiology Imaging | May 18, 2016

IAC Introduces Radiology Quality Improvement Self-Assessment Tool

Tool provides data-driven, objective measure with quantitative report to benchmark imaging quality improvement opportunities

May 18, 2016 — The Intersocietal Accreditation Commission (IAC) recently announced its launch of the IAC QI Self-Assessment Tool. Created to help facilities employ and document continuous process improvement, the new quality improvement (QI) tool provides a mechanism for meeting the quality measures required by each IAC diagnostic imaging accreditation program — Vascular Testing, Echocardiography, Nuclear/Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Computed Tomography (CT).

“Designed to engage facilities by providing an easy-to-use mechanism to perform and document ongoing quality improvement efforts, our goal with the new IAC QI Self-Assessment Tool is to encourage facilities to think critically about their work quality and to continuously identify opportunities for improvement,” said Craig Fleishman, M.D., FACC, FASE, IAC Echocardiography Board member and IAC QI Committee member.

A new feature of IAC Online Accreditation, the QI tool provides participating facilities a data-driven, objective measure of their QI progress for use in complying with the IAC Standards and Guidelines for Accreditation and fulfilling a variety of facility quality initiatives. Over time, facilities will be able to benchmark their findings both internally and with the imaging community as a whole.

Using the new tool, facilities self-assess their own imaging studies and receive a quantitative report that targets opportunities for improvements, leading to enhanced patient care.

For more information: www.intersocietal.org

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