Technology | Angiography | February 04, 2019

Canon Medical Systems Launches Alphenix Interventional Imaging Line

Alphenix systems feature all-new hi-def imaging detector to help clinicians see fine details

Canon Medical Systems Launches Alphenix Interventional Imaging Line

February 4, 2019 — Canon Medical Systems USA recently introduced its next generation of interventional systems – the Alphenix platform. The new flagship platform of systems incorporates all-new features that enable clinicians to deliver images with clarity and precision without compromising workflow and while prioritizing low dose.

With the launch of the Alphenix family, Canon Medical is also unveiling its new Alphenix Hi-Def Detector (High-Definition Flat Panel Detector), which is available on the all-new Alphenix Biplane and Alphenix Core + systems. Made up of what Canon calls the world’s first high-definition detector – with 76 micron resolution – for resolving fine details, the hybrid 12 x 12-inch panel is combined with high-definition flat panel technology that results in resolutions of 2.6 lp/mm (Standard) and 6.6 lp/mm (Hi-Def Detector). The Alphenix Hi-Def Detector technology helps clinicians see finer details during complex interventional procedures such as stent positioning and stent apposition, wire and catheter navigation through the stent struts, and observation of coil deployment.

In addition to the new Alphenix Hi-Def Detector, the Alphenix family includes the following new features:

  • Next-generation Illuvis technology to reduce image noise with less lag time, and provide clearer images at steep angles while delivering a decreased frame rate that can help reduce dose;
  • Real-Time Auto-Pixel Shift to automatically correct misalignment between the contrast image and mask image during digital subtraction angiography and 2-D roadmapping utilization; and
  • (Optional) Tablet touch-screen to optimize tableside workflow with simplified control functions and the option to assign “favorites” to customize the interface, per physician.

Canon showcased the new Alphenix and Alphenix Hi-Def Detector technology, available with the Alphenix Biplane and Alphenix Core + systems, at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) annual meeting, Nov. 25-30 in Chicago.

For more information: www.us.medical.canon

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