News | Pediatric Imaging | August 14, 2019

Ultrasound Guidance Improves First-attempt Success in IV Access in Children

CHOP study saw a nearly 40 percent increase in first-attempt success across 167 patients

Ultrasound Guidance Improves First-attempt Success in IV Access in Children. Dave Fornell

August 14, 2019 – Children’s veins are small and sometimes difficult to access during necessary medical treatment. When caregivers used ultrasound to guide placement of intravenous (IV) lines in children with presumed difficult access, they had higher success rates on their first attempt. Researchers from Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) report that this technique reduces the number of needle sticks in their young patients. 

The research was published in the July 2019 issue of Annals of Emergency Medicine.1 

“The need to place an intravenous line is a common but challenging requirement for pediatric healthcare providers,” said Alexandra M. Vinograd, M.D., an emergency medicine physician at CHOP and the lead investigator of this study. “Our research shows that both the children and their parents are happier with ultrasound-guided line insertion.” 

The researchers prospectively enrolled 167 patients identified as having difficult IV access that were randomized to receive either traditional IV line or care from a multidisciplinary team trained to place ultrasound-guided IV lines on the first attempt. The children were divided into two groups: age zero to three years old, and over age three. 

First-attempt success was higher in the ultrasound-guided IV line placement group (85.4 percent) compared to the traditional intravenous line group (45.8 percent). When asked to score their satisfaction with the IV line placement, parents favored the ultrasonically guided placement over the traditional method. 

“In our study, ultrasound-guided intravenous lines remained in place longer than traditional insertion, without an increase in complications,” said Joseph J. Zorc, M.D., emergency medicine physician at CHOP and senior author of the study. “These results may be used to update guidelines for intravenous line access in children in an effort to limit the number of needle sticks they experience.” 

Both nurses and physicians had high rates of first-attempt success. The high rate of nurse success led to a training program in CHOP’s Emergency Department that broadly trains nurses in ultrasound-guided IV line placement. “Ultrasound-guided access is now standard procedure for patients with presumed difficult intravenous access,” added Vinograd.

For more information:  www.annemergmed.com

 

Reference

1. Vinograd A.M., Chen A.E., Woodford A.L., et al. Ultrasonic Guidance to Improve First Attempt Success In Children With Predicted Difficult Intravenous Access in the Emergency Department: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Annals of Emergency Medicine, published online May 21, 2019. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.annemergmed.2019.02.019

Related Content

Screening Mammography Could Benefit Men at High Risk of Breast Cancer
News | Mammography | September 18, 2019
Selective mammography screening can provide potentially lifesaving early detection of breast cancer in men who are at...
Radiation After Immunotherapy Improves Progression-free Survival for Some Metastatic Lung Cancer Patients
News | Lung Cancer | September 18, 2019
Adding precisely aimed, escalated doses of radiation after patients no longer respond to immunotherapy reinvigorates...
Noninvasive Radioablation Offers Long-term Benefits to High-risk Heart Arrhythmia Patients
News | Radiation Therapy | September 17, 2019
September 17, 2019 — Treating high-risk heart patients with a single, high dose of...
Long-term Hormone Therapy Increases Mortality Risk for Low-PSA Men After Prostate Surgery
News | Prostate Cancer | September 16, 2019
Secondary analysis of a recent clinical trial that changed the standard of care for men with recurring prostate cancer...
Sudhen Desai, M.D.

Sudhen Desai, M.D.

Feature | Pediatric Imaging | September 04, 2019 | By Jeff Zagoudis
Burnout has become a popular buzzword in today’s business world, meant to describe prolonged periods of stress in the
Medical Imaging Rates Continue to Rise Despite Push to Reduce Their Use
News | Radiology Imaging | September 03, 2019
Despite a broad campaign among physician groups to reduce the amount of medical imaging, use rates of various scans...
News | Contrast Media | September 03, 2019
Researchers in South Korea have found that patients with family and personal history of allergic reactions to contrast...
Philips Debuts Cardiac Ultrasound and Enterprise Informatics Offerings at ESC 2019
News | Cardiac Imaging | August 30, 2019
Philips will showcase its latest cardiac care innovations at the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress 2019,...
CIRS Launches Ultrasound Quality Assurance Software
Technology | Quality Assurance (QA) | August 30, 2019
August 30, 2019 — The CIRS Ultrasound...
An example of a treatment plan for radio-ablation of the heart to noninvasively treat cardiac arrhythmias. This concept is one of the key presentations at the 2019 ASTRO meeting. Image courtesy of Cyberheart. #ASTRO19 #ASTRO2019 #ASTRO

An example of a treatment plan for radio-ablation of the heart to noninvasively treat cardiac arrhythmias. This concept is one of the key presentations at the 2019 ASTRO meeting. Image courtesy of Cyberheart.

Feature | ASTRO | August 29, 2019
August 29, 2019 — The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) announced th