News | Contrast Media | July 05, 2016

Study Finds No Association Between Gadolinium Contrast and Nervous System Disorder

Patients who did not undergo gadolinium-enhanced MRI had same rate of disorder development as those who did

MRI, gadolinium contrast, Parkinsonism, nervous system disorder, Blayne Welk, Western University

July 5, 2016 — A study appearing in the July 5 issue of JAMA assessed the association between gadolinium exposure and parkinsonism, a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system characterized by tremor and impaired muscular coordination. The study was conducted by Blayne Welk, M.D., M.Sc., of Western University, London, Canada, and colleagues.

Gadolinium-based contrast agents are used for enhancement during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Safety concerns have emerged over retained gadolinium in the globus pallidi (an area of the brain). Neurotoxic effects have been seen in animals and when gadolinium is given intrathecally (a type of method for administering a drug) in humans. Consequences of damage to the globus pallidi may include parkinsonian symptoms. For this study, multiple linked administrative databases from Ontario, Canada were used. All patients older than 66 years who underwent an initial MRI between April 2003 and March 2013 were identified. Patients who were exposed to gadolinium-enhanced MRIs were compared with patients who received non-gadolinium-enhanced MRIs.

Of the 246,557 patients undergoing at least one MRI (not of the brain or spine) during the study period, 99,739 (40.5 percent) received at least one dose of gadolinium. Among patients who underwent gadolinium-enhanced MRIs, 81.5 percent underwent a single study, and 2.5 percent underwent 4 or more gadolinium-enhanced studies. Incident parkinsonism developed in 1.2 percent of unexposed patients and 1.2 percent of those exposed to gadolinium. No significant association between gadolinium exposure and parkinsonism was found.

“This result does not support the hypothesis that gadolinium deposits in the globus pallidi lead to neuronal damage manifesting as parkinsonism. However, reports of other nonspecific symptoms (pain, cognitive changes) after gadolinium exposure require further study,” the authors wrote.

 

Related Gadolinium Safety Concern Articles

Gadolinium May Remain in Brain after Contrast MRI

MRIs During Pregnancy Are Safe, But Gadolinium Scans May Increase Risk to Fetus

ACR Manual on Contrast Media Addresses FDA Gadolinium Safety Concerns

Even High Doses of Gadolinium-Based Contrast Agents Doesn't Cause NSF

 

For more information: www.jama.jamanetwork.com

Related Content

MRI Metal Artifact Reduction Poses Minimal Thermal Risk to Hip Arthroplasty Implants
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | May 23, 2019
Clinical metal artifact reduction sequence (MARS) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocols at 3 Tesla (3T) on hip...
Proton Therapy Lowers Risk of Side Effects Compared to Conventional Radiation
News | Proton Therapy | May 23, 2019
Cancer patients getting proton therapy instead of traditional photon radiation are at a significantly lower risk of...
VolparaDensity With Tyrer-Cuzick Model Improves Breast Cancer Risk Stratification
News | Breast Density | May 22, 2019
Research has demonstrated use of Volpara Solutions' VolparaDensity software in combination with the Tyrer-Cuzick Breast...
Henry Ford Hospital's ViewRay MRIdian linear accelerator system allows real-time MRI-guided radiotherapy. Shown is the support staff for this system. In the center of the photo is Benjamin Movsas, M.D., chair of radiation oncology at Henry Ford Cancer Institute. Second from the right is Carrie Glide-Hurst, Ph.D., director of translational research, radiation oncology.

Henry Ford Hospital's ViewRay MRIdian linear accelerator system allows real-time MRI-guided radiotherapy. Shown is the support staff for this system. In the center of the photo is Benjamin Movsas, M.D., chair of radiation oncology at Henry Ford Cancer Institute. Second from the right is Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D., director of translational research, radiation oncology.

Feature | Henry Ford Hospital | May 21, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor
Henry Ford Hospital thought leaders regularly speak at the radiation oncology and radiology conferences about new res
Videos | Radiation Therapy | May 21, 2019
This is a walk through of the ViewRay MRIdian MRI-guided radiotherapy system installed at ...
Partial Breast Irradiation Effective, Convenient Treatment Option for Low-Risk Breast Cancer
News | Radiation Therapy | May 20, 2019
Partial breast irradiation produces similar long-term survival rates and risk for recurrence compared with whole breast...
AI Detects Unsuspected Lung Cancer in Radiology Reports, Augments Clinical Follow-up
News | Artificial Intelligence | May 20, 2019
Digital Reasoning announced results from its automated radiology report analytics research. In a series of experiments...
360 Photos | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | May 17, 2019
This is a dedicated cardiac Siemens 1.5T MRI system installed at the Baylor Scott White Heart Hospital in Dallas.
New Study Evaluates Head CT Examinations and Patient Complexity
News | Neuro Imaging | May 17, 2019
Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special X-ray equipment to help assess head injuries, dizziness and other...