News | SPECT Imaging | December 06, 2018

Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition

Lawsuit centers on patents GE filed related to single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) technology

Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition

December 6, 2018 — Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) cardiac imaging company Spectrum Dynamics filed a lawsuit Dec. 6, 2018, against GE Healthcare for theft and misappropriation of Spectrum Dynamics' trade secrets and intellectual property. The lawsuit was filed in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York.

The lawsuit alleges that GE deliberately, repeatedly and with fraudulent intent misappropriated Spectrum Dynamics' proprietary technology and know-how in nuclear medical (SPECT) imaging. According to Spectrum Dynamics, the technology has the potential to significantly improve clinical patient outcomes and reduce cost for hospitals and healthcare systems. The patents that GE filed relating to the technology and design of what would become the Spectrum Dynamics Veriton are based directly on Spectrum Dynamics' trade secrets and inventions, which were stolen by GE.

Spectrum Dynamics is seeking to prevent GE from developing, commercializing or otherwise using the trade secrets and novel ideas they stole from Spectrum Dynamics.

Spectrum Dynamics' lawsuit also claims unfair competition and further seeks to correct "inventorship" on GE patents, which claim Spectrum Dynamics' inventions, and obtain constructive ownership of the GE patents. Spectrum Dynamics is seeking both preliminary and permanent injunctive relief to prevent GE's continued exploitation of Spectrum's intellectual property.

Spectrum Dynamics' Veriton/Veriton-CT is the first multi-purpose, 12-detector SPECT scanning machine that allows for 360-degree, full-body contour scanning, according to the company. This produces three-dimensional coronary, bone and neuro images that are twice the image resolution of conventional cameras. It is also the first and only technically optimized design enabling the broad-based transition from analog to digital for the SPECT imaging equipment market.

Greenblum & Bernstein P.L.C. is serving as legal counsel to Spectrum Dynamics in connection with this matter.

For more information: www.spectrum-dynamics.com

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