Technology | CT Angiography (CTA) | June 29, 2016

HeartFlow Introduces Next-generation Platform

New algorithms, cloud-based infrastructure designed to deliver results to clinicians more quickly

HeartFlow, FFR-CT Analysis, next-generation platform, second FDA clearance

June 29, 2016 — HeartFlow Inc. announced that it is launching its next generation of the HeartFlow FFR-CT Analysis. The result of years of development, the next-generation platform includes major advancements in the process and algorithms HeartFlow uses to calculate fractional flow reserve-computed tomography (FFR-CT) values.

 

Watch a video about FFR-CT from ACC.16

 

These technology advancements resulted in the second U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearance for HeartFlow’s technology. The company will introduce the next-generation platform to new and existing customers in the coming weeks.

Major enhancements of the new platform include:

  • Advanced algorithms and streamlined case processing, which will provide the HeartFlow Analysis results to clinicians more quickly;
  • Cloud-based infrastructure utilizing Amazon Web Services (AWS), to ensure that delivery of the HeartFlow service is more secure, robust and scalable; and
  • Increased security measures to address the needs of healthcare institutions worldwide.

According to the company, the HeartFlow Analysis is the only non-invasive technology to provide insight into both the extent of coronary artery disease and the impact that disease has on blood flow to the heart, enabling clinicians to select an appropriate treatment. The technology, which first received de novo clearance from the FDA in 2014, is also available in Canada, Europe and Japan, and has been used to guide the treatment of thousands of patients globally.

“One of the benefits of HeartFlow’s cloud-based platform is that the technology utilizes the data we receive from our global community of clinicians,” said Charles A. Taylor, Ph.D., co-founder and chief technology officer of HeartFlow. “As the number of HeartFlow patients grows, the HeartFlow Analysis continues to improve as we apply deep learning technology to this vast set of data.”

Deep learning involves integrating multiple layers of nonlinear algorithms to help identify patterns and improve understanding of the information. By applying deep learning to large amounts of image data, HeartFlow has the potential to improve the performance with future software releases to help physicians better manage patients with coronary artery disease.

 

Watch a video about how FFR-CT works

For more information: www.heartflow.com

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