News | Radiation Therapy | December 12, 2019

First Patient Treated with New Proteus ONE Solution at the University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute

UFHPTI expands its proton therapy capacity and treatment range

UFHPTI expands its proton therapy capacity and treatment range with the Proteous One

December 12, 2019 — IBA (Ion Beam Applications SA) announced that the University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute (UFHPTI) has started the first treatments with its Proteus ONE solution. The Proteus ONE solution comes as a complement of the ProteusPLUS solution, in operations since 2006, to meet the increasing demand of proton therapy treatment.
 
With its open gantry enabling a high patient throughput, the IBA compact proton therapy solution has been installed within 11 months at UFHPTI and includes latest generation precision technologies of pencil beam scanning (PBS) and cone beam CT (CBCT) capabilities as well as the Philips Ambient Experience.
 
At the end of 2019, UFHPTI has treated over 8,500 patients with its Proteus PLUS solution. Since opening in 2006, the center has been treating patients with three gantry rooms and one eye line. With the two IBA Proteus proton therapy solutions, UFHPTI has the ability to treat 25 percent more patients.
 
To date, there are 33 IBA proton therapy centers in operation worldwide of which 10 are compact Proteus ONE systems making it the undisputed market leader in both single and multi-room configurations.
 
Olivier Legrain, chief executive officer of IBA, commented: “We are pleased to see the first patient has begun the treatment with our compact proton therapy solution in Jacksonville and expand further our trustful collaboration with UFHPTI. UFHPTI has been one of the pioneers in proton therapy and will continue to lead its development with exciting innovations coming up. IBA is developing game changing techniques such as Proton ARC1 Therapy and FLASH1 therapy.”
 
Stuart Klein, MHA, executive director of University of Florida Health Proton Therapy Institute, added: “The start of patient treatment with the Proteus ONE marks a major milestone in a multiphase expansion and upgrade project that improves treatment efficiency and technology. Over the last 15 years, we have developed a trusted long-standing partnership with IBA. With this new facility that complements our existing proton therapy system, we can meet the growing demand for proton therapy treatments. We are also eager to play a leading role in the development of new technologies such as Proton Arc Therapy, that will enable us to treat even more patients in the future.”

For more information: www.iba-worldwide.com
 

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