News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | February 01, 2017

Cardiac MRI Reveals How Short-term Sleep Deprivation Affects Heart Function

RSNA study uses cardiac MR strain analysis, blood and urine samples to assess cardiac contractility, blood pressure and heart rate

RSNA 2016, short-term sleep deprivation effects, heart function, clinical study, cardiac magnetic resonance, CMR strain analysis

February 1, 2017 — Too little sleep takes a toll on your heart, according to a new study presented at the 2016 annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), Nov. 27-Dec. 1 in Chicago.

People who work in fire and emergency medical services, medical residencies and other high-stress jobs are often called upon to work 24-hour shifts with little opportunity for sleep. While it is known that extreme fatigue can affect many physical, cognitive and emotional processes, this is the first study to examine how working a 24-hour shift specifically affects cardiac function.

"For the first time, we have shown that short-term sleep deprivation in the context of 24-hour shifts can lead to a significant increase in cardiac contractility, blood pressure and heart rate," said study author Daniel Kuetting, M.D., from the Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology at the University of Bonn in Bonn, Germany.

For the study, Kuetting and colleagues recruited 20 healthy radiologists, including 19 men and one woman, with a mean age of 31.6 years. Each of the study participants underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging with strain analysis before and after a 24-hour shift with an average of three hours of sleep.

"Cardiac function in the context of sleep deprivation has not previously been investigated with CMR strain analysis, the most sensitive parameter of cardiac contractility," Kuetting said.

The researchers also collected blood and urine samples from the participants and measured blood pressure and heart rate.

Following short-term sleep deprivation, the participants showed significant increases in mean peak systolic strain (pre = -21.9; post = -23.4), systolic (112.8; 118.5) and diastolic (62.9; 69.2) blood pressure and heart rate (63.0; 68.9). In addition, the participants had significant increases in levels of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroid hormones FT3 and FT4, and cortisol, a hormone released by the body in response to stress.

Although the researchers were able to perform follow-up examinations on half of the participants after regular sleep, Kuetting noted that further study in a larger cohort is needed to determine possible long-term effects of sleep loss.

"The study was designed to investigate real-life work-related sleep deprivation," Kuetting said. "While the participants were not permitted to consume caffeine or food and beverages containing theobromine, such as chocolate, nuts or tea, we did not take into account factors like individual stress level or environmental stimuli."

As people continue to work longer hours or work at more than one job to make ends meet, it is critical to investigate the detrimental effects of too much work and not enough sleep. Kuetting believes the results of this pilot study are transferable to other professions in which long periods of uninterrupted labor are common.

"These findings may help us better understand how workload and shift duration affect public health," he said.

Co-authors on the study are Andreas Feisst, M.D., Rami Homsi, M.D., Julian A. Luetkens, M.D., Daniel Thomas, M.D., Ph.D., Hans H. Schild, M.D., and Darius Dabir, M.D.

For more information: www.rsna.org

Related Content

Two magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings — joint capsule edema and thickness at the axillary recess, specifically — proved useful in predicting stiff shoulder in patients with rotator cuff tears, according to an ahead-of-print article in the May issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

A: Oblique coronal fat-suppressed T2-weighted MR image shows normal hypointense joint capsule at axillary recess (arrow). Note full-thickness tear of supraspinatus tendon (arrowheads) B: Oblique sagittal proton density MR image shows preserved subcoracoid fat triangle (asterisk). Image courtesy of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | February 20, 2020
February 20, 2020 — Two ma...
Arizona State University researchers (in collaboration with Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center) have discovered a biocompatible cost-effective hydrogel that can be used to monitor therapeutic doses of ionizing radiation by becoming more pink with increasing radiation exposure

Arizona State University researchers (in collaboration with Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center) have discovered a biocompatible cost-effective hydrogel that can be used to monitor therapeutic doses of ionizing radiation by becoming more pink with increasing radiation exposure. This picture shows a circle of hydrogel that was irradiated on the left half, which is slightly pink; whereas the right half of the gel is not irradiated and remains colorless.

News | Radiation Therapy | February 18, 2020
February 18, 2020 — More than half of all cancer patients undergo radiation therapy and the dose is critical.
The Caption Guidance software uses artificial intelligence to guide users to get optimal cardiac ultrasound images in a point of care ultrasound (POCUS) setting.

The Caption Guidance software uses artificial intelligence to guide users to get optimal cardiac ultrasound images in a point of care ultrasound (POCUS) setting.

News | Artificial Intelligence | February 13, 2020
February 13, 2020 — The U.S.
Hyperfine Research, Inc. announced that it has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 510(k) clearance for the world’s first bedside Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system

Hyperfine's point-of-care MRI wheels directly to the patient’s bedside, plugs into a standard electrical wall outlet, and is controlled via a wireless tablet. Photo courtesy of Business Wire

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | February 12, 2020
February 12, 2020 — Hyperfine Research, Inc. announced that i
The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents market is expected to grow rapidly

Image courtesy of GE Healthcare

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | February 11, 2020
February 11, 2020 — The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents market is expected to grow rapidly in the fo
Accuray TomoTherapy total body irradiation
News | Radiation Therapy | February 07, 2020
February 7, 2020 — Accuray Incorporated announced that two new studies demonstrate the benefits of the ...
Gadolinium-based contrast agents

UT Dallas faculty members who collaborated with Dr. Jeremiah Gassensmith (center, back), associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry, include Dr. Lloyd Lumata (left, back), assistant professor of physics, and Dr. Steven Nielsen, associate professor of chemistry. Chemistry graduate students in Gassensmith’s lab include (from left, front) Oliva Brohlin, Arezoo Shahrivarkevishahi and Laurel Hagge.

News | Contrast Media | February 06, 2020
February 6, 2020 — University of Texas at Dallas researchers
Qynapse, a medical technology company, announced that it received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 510(k) clearance for its QyScore software
News | Information Technology | February 04, 2020
February 4, 2020 — Qynapse, a medical technology company, anno
News | Clinical Trials | February 03, 2020
February 3, 2020 — Melding the genetic and cellular analysis of tumors with how they appear in medical images could g