News | Treatment Planning | March 19, 2019

ZON-PTC in Clinical Use With RayStation 8B and Hyperscan

First patient treatment conducted for head and neck cancer patient

ZON-PTC in Clinical Use With RayStation 8B and Hyperscan

March 19, 2019 — Zuid-Oost Nederland Protonen Therapie Centrum (ZON-PTC), Maastricht, Netherlands, recently treated its first patient using the combination of the treatment planning system (TPS) RayStation from RaySearch in combination with the Mevion S250i Proton Therapy System with Hyperscan Pencil Beam Scanning.

RayStation was the selected treatment planning system in 2017, when the proton therapy center was established. ZON-PTC is a joint undertaking between MAASTRO clinic and the Maastricht University Medical Center (Maastricht UMC+). The center opened early this year, and the first patient treatment has successfully been conducted. The first patient was treated for head and neck cancer, and during the year the center will continue to treat patients with different tumor sites.

The clinic is equipped with Mevion S250i Proton Therapy System with Hyperscan Pencil Beam Scanning. ZON-PTC was one of the first centers to use RayStation 8B clinically.

Geert Bosmans, managing director and medical physicist, at ZON-PTC, said, “We have used RayStation clinically since 2017 and are very satisfied with our selection. RayStation is a very smooth and efficient system, presenting treatment plans with excellent quality. The use of RayStation 8B with Mevion’s S250i Proton Therapy System, allows us to reach the full potential of the hardware. We are delighted that the treatments have gone so well and are looking forward to a successful collaboration with RaySearch.”

For more information: www.raysearchlabs.com

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