Webinar | Medical 3-D Printing| August 09, 2017

WEBINAR: 3D Printing at Medtronic - Medical Applications and Outcomes

3D printing of the heart and coronary artery tree from a patient's CT scan.

Learn how 3-D printing empowers medical device manufacturer Medtronic to bring products to market faster, develop better therapies and engage in earlier clinical validation. With functionally accurate, 3-D printed prototypes, Medtronic can complete more design revisions in less time, empower physician feedback through an improved validation process, and gather clinically relevant feedback to accelerate time to market. In this webinar, see how Stratasys technologies enable Medtronic to save time and reduce cost, while also optimizing product performance.  

The webinar took place Sept. 14, but you can still access the archived version.

Register for this webinar

Related Content

Smoldering Spots in the Brain May Signal Severe MS

NIH researchers found that dark rimmed spots representing ongoing, “smoldering” inflammation, may be a hallmark of more disabling forms of multiple sclerosis. Image courtesy of Reich lab, NIH/NINDS.

News | Neuro Imaging | August 22, 2019
Aided by a high-powered brain scanner and a 3-D printer, National Institutes of Health (NIH) researchers peered inside...
Sectra Signs Enterprise Imaging Contract With Vanderbilt Health
News | Enterprise Imaging | August 21, 2019
Sectra will install its enterprise imaging picture archiving and communication system (PACS) and vendor neutral archive...
Videos | Treatment Planning | August 21, 2019
This is an example of the Mirada DLCExpert deep learning software that automatically identifies organs, segments and
Videos | Computed Tomography (CT) | August 21, 2019
This is a quick walk around of a mobile 32-slice...
News | Cybersecurity | August 20, 2019
Healthcare data breaches are currently being reported at a rate of more than one a day, according to a new report from...
The CT scanner might not come with protocols that are adequate for each hospital situation, so at Phoenix Children’s Hospital they designed their own protocols, said Dianna Bardo, M.D., director of body MR and co-director of the 3D Innovation Lab at Phoenix Children’s.

The CT scanner might not come with protocols that are adequate for each hospital situation, so at Phoenix Children’s Hospital they designed their own protocols, said Dianna Bardo, M.D., director of body MR and co-director of the 3D Innovation Lab at Phoenix Children’s.

Sponsored Content | Case Study | Radiation Dose Management | August 13, 2019
Radiation dose management is central to child patient safety. Medical imaging plays an increasing role in the accurate...
Lake Medical Imaging Selects Infinitt for Multi-site RIS/PACS
News | PACS | August 09, 2019
Infinitt North America will be implementing Infinitt RIS (radiology information system)/PACS (picture archiving and...
Half of Hospital Decision Makers Plan to Invest in AI by 2021
News | Artificial Intelligence | August 08, 2019
August 8, 2019 — A recent study conducted by Olive AI explores how hospital leaders are responding to the imperative
NetDirector Launches Cloud-based PDF to DICOM Conversion Service
News | PACS | August 08, 2019
NetDirector, a cloud-based data exchange and integration platform, has diversified their radiology automation options...
RSNA and ACR to Collaborate on Landmark Medical 3D Printing Registry
News | Medical 3-D Printing | August 08, 2019
The Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) and the American College of Radiology (ACR) will launch a new medical...