News | Angiography | November 21, 2016

Toshiba Angiography Systems Help Maximize Flexibility, Minimize Exposure, Optimize Image Quality

Continuum of systems provide a configurations to fit speciality clinical and patient needs

Infinix-i Sky +, RSNA 2016, Toshiba, angiography systems

Toshiba Medical’s Infinix-i product line, including the Infinix-i Sky +, delivers patient access, image quality and safety features for virtually any image-guided procedure, including those in hybrid OR settings.

November 21, 2016 – Healthcare providers seeking versatile imaging technology for their angiography needs can find a customized solution with Toshiba Medical’s Infinix-i product line. From embolization, angioplasty, shunt repair or virtually any other image-guided procedure, including those in hybrid OR settings, the Infinix-i delivers optimum image quality, industry leading dose management tools and unprecedented flexibility and patient access. Toshiba Medical has recently introduced new and renamed legacy systems, so customers can easily identify the technology that matches their clinical and patient situation. With head-to-toe and fingertip-to-fingertip coverage, a 270-degree gantry pivot, as well as offering the ability to maintain a heads-up display during complex angles with synchronized rotating collimators and flat panel detectors,* the Infinix-i lineup features the following systems:

• Infinix-i Core: Designed specifically for routine interventional cardiology procedures with a compact single plane C-arm at an affordable price-point.

• Infinix-i Core +: Our patented five-axis single-plane, floor-mounted system achieves angulations that are optimal for both routine interventional cardiology and radiology procedures. Ergonomic design with “WorkRite technology” allows monitor viewing at any point in the room, designed to help clinicians improve clinical workflow.

• Infinix-i Sky +: With 3D imaging anywhere, the Infinix-i Sky + combines Toshiba Medical’s unique sliding double C-arm design to deliver unprecedented flexibility and quality. With an innovative C-arm flip and 3D imaging from anywhere, head-end, left or right side, the system is ideal for advanced interventional radiology and oncology procedures.

• Infinix-i Biplane: The only three-in-one biplane room that combines the flexibility of floor- and ceiling-mounted positioners with simplified biplane positioning for unprecedented access and coverage. Designed for both biplane cardiology and biplane neurology procedures, the system operates as a fully functional single plane system when a biplane room is not necessary.

• Infinix-i Dual Plane: The only system with two dedicated C-arms to help clinicians treat more patients cost-effectively, with the ability to perform cardiac and peripheral procedures in the same room.

 Infinix-i 4D CT: Seamlessly integrates the interventional lab and CT to allow clinicians to plan, treat and verify in a single clinical setting.

“Toshiba Medical has an XRVL legacy of helping clinicians provide the ultimate in patient access, care and safety,” said Bill Newsom, director, X-ray vascular business unit, Toshiba America Medical Systems. “We’ve been able to continue that legacy with the recent launch of the Infinix-i Sky +, which allows clinicians to move the C-arm around the patient, rather than the other way around.”

Toshiba Medical is showcasing its Infinix-i product line at this year’s Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) annual meeting in Chicago, Nov. 27 – Dec. 2, 
2016 (Booth 7334, North Hall).
 
For more information: www.medical.toshiba.com

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