News | Enterprise Imaging | October 24, 2016

Sectra Spotlights Enterprise Imaging at RSNA 2016

Company will display solutions to support imaging workflows across departments as well as cross-enterprise image sharing

Sectra, RSNA 2016, PACS, radiology, enterprise imaging, VNA

October 20, 2016 — Sectra has a complete enterprise imaging offering supporting the most image-intense departments. At the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA 2016), the company will showcase its enterprise imaging solutions for radiology and mammography, as well as offerings for cross-enterprise image sharing.

Sectra PACS is designed for high-production environments with usability and availability in focus. Highlights include functions to speed up oncology workflows such as lesion tracking and anatomical linking. Their Advanced Visualization portfolio, fully integrated in Sectra PACS (picture archiving and communication system), also supports computed tomography (CT) liver surgery planning and reviewing fusion images, as well as complex multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, such as MRI breast, female pelvis and prostate.

In addition to improving the diagnostic workflows, Sectra PACS supports teaching and quality improvements. The latest news in this area includes Peer Review workflow support.

Sectra PACS features functionality for efficient mammography screening and diagnostic breast imaging workflows. True vendor-neutral multimodality capabilities enable display of breast images from any modality — including digital pathology — side by side with the mammograms. This gives a complete patient overview from one single work spot. Sectra Breast Imaging PACS supports fully integrated breast tomosynthesis reading as well as MRI integrated within the mammography workflow. It also features strong workflow management tools, allowing efficient hosting of tumor boards and workflows being driven based on breast density.

Combined with Sectra’s solutions for business analytics and dose monitoring, the users get a comprehensive breast imaging solution that truly drives efficiency and quality improvements.

New features in the latest release include breast implant masking, further streamlined hanging protocols and an integrated Peer Review package.

Timely and actionable reports

Sectra's reporting module, developed with complex oncology cases in mind, ensures quick and easy access to relevant priors together with the current request and images. It also enables radiologists to document their findings in direct connection with the image review, with no extra mouse clicks. Support for structured reporting and rich reporting helps make radiology reports actionable and easy to interpret for referring physicians. The solution also supports resident workflows.

 

Integrated diagnostics

The digitization of pathology is an enabler and a prerequisite for increased collaboration across specialties. Sectra's solution for digital pathology is built on the same platform as its radiology PACS, enabling bi-directional sharing of images and reports, which creates a transparency across cancer care pathways. This transparency allows for correlation of findings and provides a broader view of patient disease for physicians to conclude more accurate diagnosis and treatment decisions.

 

Efficient multidisciplinary team meetings

Sectra's solutions for radiology and pathology both include functionality for preparing and presenting at multidisciplinary team meetings. The joint platform enables pathologists and radiologists to add images to the same list during the actual review work. The annotations and image settings performed during the review would then be applied automatically, streamlining the preparation workflow. During the presentation, the radiologist and the pathologist can use the same system to show images, annotations and administrate follow-up tasks. At RSNA, Sectra will demonstrate existing tools for multidisciplinary team meetings, but also ideas for future product development.

 

Consolidated patient overview

Sectra offers solutions for capturing, storing and accessing virtually all images, video, audio and documents. Sectra VNA (vendor neutral archive) consolidates image handling, while ensuring clinical workflow efficiency, growth management and business continuity. Sectra UniView enables easy access to the complete patient information, including pathology images, from anywhere in the enterprise.

 

Cross-enterprise image exchange

Sectra's cross-enterprise platform facilitates health information exchange and cooperation even on a national scale. The solutions enable efficient sharing and collaboration of images, workload and competencies, thus facilitating more efficient use of resources, reducing lead times and improving diagnostic quality. New features include the possibility to easily share images with patients and others outside of the hospital environment.

 

Simplified dose management

Developed in close collaboration with physicists, Sectra DoseTrack is a web-based, flexible and easy-to-use tool to monitor patient radiation doses and ensure that they are kept as low as reasonably achievable.

 

Early detection of osteoporosis

With a single, standard X-ray image of the hand, acquired on the mammography modality or any other X-ray equipment, it is possible to measure women’s bone health (bone mineral density, BMD). The test calculates the risk for future fractures with the highest precision in the market, according to Sectra, offering women the opportunity of a better quality of life. It takes about 30 seconds to perform, and it is fully integrated into the mammography workflow.

 

Improved service to orthopedists

Sectra offers a complete set of highly efficient pre-operative planning tools both for 2-D and 3-D images. The latter are especially valuable for planning complex trauma cases. Sectra’s solution enables orthopedic surgeons to increase precision in planning and advance preparation for various scenarios, thereby avoiding stress, saving time and minimizing risk during surgery. The solution also creates a well-documented workflow to meet regulatory demands.

 

Improved medical education

With the possibility of repeated interaction with virtual representations of real bodies rendered from clinical imaging throughout their education, students, residents and medical professionals are able to gain deeper understanding and insight into anatomy, and the functions and processes inside the body. Easy access to all types of medical images, including 3-D renderings, provides the ability to demonstrate anatomical variations and — in combination with the possibility to study multiple cases — this contributes to enhanced medical education and clinical training.

For more information: www.sectra.com

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