Technology | December 27, 2010

Pediatric Positioning Chair Provides Secure Immobilization

Pediatric Positioning Chair Provides Secure Immobilization

December 28, 2010 — The Pedia-Poser pediatric positioning chair provides fast, gentle and secure immobilization of infants through 4-year-olds for X-ray imaging. It features a saddle seat with detachable saddle horn that is form-fitting and safe. The bench seat for older children includes a detachable saddle horn that aids in positioning. In either configuration, the saddle horn supports a protective genital lead shield.

Immobilization is done gently and securely; the patient is secured only once – the chair rotates, positioning for different views. It keeps the patient as close to the film as possible to ensure high-quality images. The adjustable back and head-tilt support fits patients of all sizes. Critical chair components are X-ray lucent for optimal X-ray contrast.

The Pedia-Poser is made from germ-resistant, nonporous polyethylene and is easy to keep clean. It features high-quality lockable casters to provide mobility and stability. It helps to ensure accurate positioning, which can eliminate retakes, saving time and money.

For more information: www.clearimagedevices.com

Related Content

Sudhen Desai, M.D.

Sudhen Desai, M.D.

Feature | Pediatric Imaging | September 04, 2019 | By Jeff Zagoudis
Burnout has become a popular buzzword in today’s business world, meant to describe prolonged periods of stress in the
Medical Imaging Rates Continue to Rise Despite Push to Reduce Their Use
News | Radiology Imaging | September 03, 2019
Despite a broad campaign among physician groups to reduce the amount of medical imaging, use rates of various scans...
Adept Medical Launches Antegrade IR Platform
Technology | Interventional Radiology | September 03, 2019
New Zealand-based Adept Medical announced the launch of the Antegrade IR Platform. Clinically driven, it is placed to...
The Siemens Ysio Max digital radiography system.
Webinar | Digital Radiography (DR) | September 03, 2019
The Webinar "Benefits of Advanced Automation in X-ray" will be presented Wednesday, Sept. 25 at 1 p.m.
A SPECT nuclear scan of the heart to show perfusion defects in the myocardium due to coronary artery blockages or heart attack. The imaging uses the Mo-99 based medical imaging isotope Tc-99m. The U.S. government has created policy to move away from use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) for Mo-99 isotope production, but there is one hold out who has not yet converted before a 2020 deadline. Photo courtesy of Philips Healthcare.

A SPECT nuclear scan of the heart to show perfusion defects in the myocardium due to coronary artery blockages or heart attack. The imaging uses the Mo-99 based medical imaging isotope Tc-99m. The U.S. government has created policy to move away from use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) for Mo-99 isotope production, but there is one holdout who has not yet converted before a 2020 deadline. Photo courtesy of Philips Healthcare.

Feature | Nuclear Imaging | August 30, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor
In a surprising move, the National Institute for Radioelements (IRE) has applied for a new license to export highly e
Videos | Computed Tomography (CT) | August 21, 2019
This is a quick walk around of a mobile 32-slice...
The top piece of content in July was a video interview explaining how Princess Margaret Cancer Center is using machine learning to create automated treatment plans. This was a hot topic at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting in July.

The top piece of content in July was a video interview explaining how Princess Margaret Cancer Center is using machine learning to create automated treatment plans. This was a hot topic at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting in July. 

Feature | August 05, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor
August 5, 2019 — Here is the list of the most popular content on the Imaging Technology New (ITN) magazine website fr
Demand for ultrasound scans at U.S. outpatient centers could grow by double digits over the next five years, according to a speaker at AHRA 2019. A variety of factors, however, could cause projections for this and other modalities to change. Graphic courtesy of Pixabay

Demand for ultrasound scans at U.S. outpatient centers could grow by double digits over the next five years, according to a speaker at AHRA 2019. A variety of factors, however, could cause projections for this and other modalities to change. Graphic courtesy of Pixabay

Feature | Radiology Imaging | July 29, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
The coming years may be good for the medical imaging community in the United States. But they will not be easy.