News | Mobile Devices | January 31, 2018

Nine in Ten Clinicians to Use Mobile Technology at Bedside by 2022

Global survey finds improvement in quality of patient care and reduced medication administration errors cited among expected benefits

Nine in Ten Clinicians to Use Mobile Technology at Bedside by 2022

January 31, 2018 – Zebra Technologies Corp. announced the results of its Future of Healthcare: 2022 Hospital Vision Study, revealing the impact of mobile technology use in acute care hospitals. The research — which incorporates feedback from nursing managers, information technology (IT) decision-makers and patients — offers a perspective from the front-line of patient care. It also highlights the transformational power clinical mobility is expected to have on global health services within the next five years.

Zebra’s 2022 Hospital Vision Study identified the rising adoption of clinical mobility – the use of mobile devices such as handheld mobile computers, tablets, cordless barcode scanners and mobile printers –  in hospitals around the world. Seventy-two percent of surveyed decision-makers say that mobile devices are improving the quality of patient care, giving clinicians actionable intelligence at the bedside with the effect of increasing time with patients and reducing errors.

The benefits of clinical mobility are fueling an increase in adoption of mobile technologies at every level of care, according to Zebra. According to survey respondents, nearly all hospitals estimate that mobile devices will be used at the bedside by nurses (97 percent) and physicians (98 percent) by 2022, but also increasingly by other members of the care team such as pharmacists, lab technicians, radiologists and patient transport professionals. The study also highlighted how patients perceive the rise of clinical mobility with nearly eight-in-ten survey respondents feeling positive about mobile tools being used to improve their care.

Key survey findings include:

  • Clinical mobility is rapidly becoming the global standard for patient care: Zebra’s 2022 Hospital Vision Study identified the rising adoption of clinical mobile solutions across all disciplines by 2022. Interestingly, this growth includes areas where mobility is already widely used (bedside nurses rising from 65 to 95 percent), as well as a major increase across other areas such as pharmacist and pharmacy technicians (from 42 to 96 percent), lab technicians (from 52 to 96 percent) and intensive care nurses (from 38 to 93 percent);
  • Study highlights reduction in preventable errors as key benefit: Surveyed nursing managers and IT decision-makers expect clinical mobility to reduce errors in areas including medication administration (61 percent) and specimen collection labeling (52 percent);
  • Mobile technologies allow clinical staff to spend more time at a patient’s bedside: By 2022, 91 percent of nurses are expected to access electronic health records (EHRs), medical and drug databases (92 percent), and lab diagnostic results (88 percent) using a mobile device, reducing time that must be spent away from patients;
  • Communications are expected to improve due to rising clinical mobility adoption: Nearly Seven-in-ten of surveyed nurse managers credit clinical mobility with improving staff communication and collaboration as well as the quality of patient care, while 64 percent of surveyed IT decision-makers identify nurse-to-physician communications as a top area for improvement;
  • Clinical mobility will be augmented with real-time location information to streamline workflows: Real-time location systems (RTLS) will be used to locate everything from equipment, supplies and pharmaceuticals to patients and staff. This visibility will allow administrators to increase bed availability, staff workflow and safety;
  • Improved data streams integrated through handheld mobile technology are expected to improve detection and notification of life-threatening conditions: By 2022, 98 percent of surveyed IT decision-makers expect predictive analytics and early notification for life- threatening conditions, such as sepsis and hospital-acquired infection, will be sent to clinicians’ mobile devices; and
  • Patients are aware of the benefits of clinical mobility and becoming more active participants in the delivery of their healthcare: The majority of surveyed patients (77 percent) expressed positivity about clinician usage of mobile technologies to improve the quality of their care.

Zebra commissioned three global research studies to better understand the role of technology in acute care hospitals. The surveys conducted in conjunction with research partners (Research Now, Lucid) focused on nursing managers, IT decision makers and recently hospitalized patients. Zebra’s 2022 Hospital Vision Study summarizes the results of this analysis and compiles the feedback from over 1,500 respondents across the United States, Brazil, China, United Kingdom, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Qatar and United Arab Emirates, with a diverse range of involvement and perspectives on healthcare delivery. The surveys were conducted in 2017.

For more information: www.zebra.com

 

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