Technology | Advanced Visualization | April 02, 2019

Medivis Unveils AnatomyX Augmented Reality Education Platform

AnatomyX offers medical students, instructors and administrators an immersive visualization platform for studying human anatomy

Medivis Unveils AnatomyX Augmented Reality Education Platform

April 2, 2019 — Medical imaging and visualization company Medivis announced the launch of AnatomyX, its augmented reality (AR) platform for anatomy education. Currently enabled on Microsoft's HoloLens AR technology and Magic Leap's spatial computing device, Magic Leap One, AnatomyX offers any member of a large university or medical institution an enterprise-grade learning platform for the study of human anatomy, physiology and pathology.

Benefits and features of AnatomyX include:

  • Life-like detail: Provides access to expertly modeled male and female bodies from real patient computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), with more than 5,000 unique structures that are continuously updated for ever-growing detail. Each model includes advanced textures, normal maps and lighting for a photorealistic experience.
  • Interactive design: Users can access more than 100 voice commands for easy navigation by system and/or region. Hand gesture controls using the latest in computer vision technology are also available along with advanced speech recognition application programming interface (API) for medical terminology. Exclusively with Magic Leap, an optional six-degree-of-freedom control is integrated for precise interactions.
  • Dashboards: Secure accounts can be created on the platform for every student, professor and administrator. All data, including quiz/test results, is securely stored in the Medivis cloud infrastructure. The platform's advanced analytics then allow for instructor insight into student and class progress.
  • Multi-User Collaboration: The platform allows for real-time collaboration with up to 20 users simultaneously and advanced modes including dissection, isolation and mastery. The platform allows self-exploration and/or expertly guided instruction.

Medical institutions and universities such as West Coast University are already using AnatomyX to accelerate their learning curriculums. Initial research from pilot institutions has shown:

  • Fifteen percent higher student performance on standardized assessments;
  • Ninety percent of students reported enhanced understanding of curriculum material; and
  • Ninety percent of students reported strong value with the overall learning experience

Pilot partnerships are available to assess the quantitative and qualitative enhancements to the student educational experience. Participants gain access to the Medivis library of content and comprehensive technical support to ensure success.

For more information: www.medivis.com

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