News | November 15, 2010

High-Speed Image Gateway Introduced

November 15, 2010 — The new Turbo Gateway is said to deliver images to and from a cloud-based image repository up to 300% faster than existing technologies.

Part of the SeeMyRadiology.com product suite, Turbo Gateway overcomes the limitations of the DICOM transfer protocol to speed data over a conventional internet connection, while continuing to support a standard interface with all picture archiving and communications systems (PACS) and imaging modalities.

The SeeMyRadiology Turbo Gateway is a compact, easy-to-install software, also available as an appliance, that connects directly to a facility’s local area network (LAN). The device maximizes the utilization of available internet bandwidth and optimizes transmission of imaging data in a cloud computing environment. Taking advantage of a new data handling methodology, the device has shown sustained average speeds of 4.5 computed tomography (CT) images/second and 8 magnetic resonance (MR) images/second in benchmark testing over a 10mbps internet connection.

Based on these metrics, distribution times of studies via a cloud environment will be reduced to less than one minute for a 100MB study. Turbo Gateway ensures a high level of security without the need for VPNs and also provides built-in data validation, uptime monitoring and fault tolerance.

Internet image transfer speed is becoming increasingly important as a growing number of imaging providers rely on cloud-based technology to communicate with staff radiologists in multiple locations, offsite teleradiology providers, referring physicians and outside institutions. Radiology practices need fast, streamlined image communications to compete in today’s challenging healthcare environment.

Rapid, easy-to-enable cloud-based image communication can help many sites eliminate the costly and time-consuming production of imaging CDs and provide valuable real-time image communications for trauma transfers and tertiary referrals, resulting in enhanced patient care.

For more information: www.seemyradiology.com or www.accelarad.com

Related Content

#COVID19 #Coronavirus #2019nCoV #Wuhanvirus #SARScov2 U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams, M.D., M.Ph demonstrates how the general public can make their own face masks for non-clinical use.

U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams, M.D., M.Ph. demonstrates how the general public can make their own face masks for non-clinical use.

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | April 04, 2020 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane
April 4, 2020 — The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
#COVID19 #Coronavirus #2019nCoV #Wuhanvirus #SARScov2

Getty Images

Feature | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | April 03, 2020 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane and Dave Fornell
In an effort to keep the imaging field updated on the latest information being released on coronavirus (COVID-19), th
Recommended best practices for nuclear imaging departments under the COVIF-19 pandemic have been issues by the ASNC and SNMMI. #COVID19 #ASNC #SNMMI #Coronavirus #SARScov2
News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | April 03, 2020
April 3, 2020 — A new guidance document on best practices to maintain safety and minimize contamination in nuclear im
Jeannie Danker, M.D. #COVID19 #Coronavirus #2019nCoV #Wuhanvirus #SARScov2

Jeannie Danker, M.D. Photo courtesy of The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | April 03, 2020 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane
April 3, 2020 — The radiology world has lost a dedicated leader due to...
An estimated 44 million people worldwide are currently living with Alzheimer’s disease, the most common form of dementia. About 5.8 million people in the United States live with the disease, where it is the sixth leading cause of death overall. While there is not yet a cure for Alzheimer’s, researchers are working to find treatment options to delay its onset and prevent it from developing.

Image courtesy of Insightec

Feature | Ultrasound Imaging | April 02, 2020 | By Katie Caron
An estimated 44 million people worldwide are currently living with...
An example of Philips’ TrueVue technology, which offers photo-realistic rendering and the ability to change the location of the lighting source on 3-D ultrasound images. In this example of two Amplazer transcatheter septal occluder devices in the heart, the operator demonstrating the product was able to push the lighting source behind the devices into the other chamber of the heart. This illuminated a hole that was still present that the occluders did not seal.

An example of Philips’ TrueVue technology, which offers photo-realistic rendering and the ability to change the location of the lighting source on 3-D ultrasound images. In this example of two Amplazer transcatheter septal occluder devices in the heart, the operator demonstrating the product was able to push the lighting source behind the devices into the other chamber of the heart. This illuminated a hole that was still present that the occluders did not seal. Photo by Dave Fornell

Feature | Radiology Imaging | April 02, 2020 | By Katie Caron
A new year — and decade — offers the opportunity to reflect on the advancements and challenges of years gone by and p
#COVID19 #Coronavirus #2019nCoV #Wuhanvirus

Getty Images

Feature | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | April 02, 2020 | Jilan Liu and HIMSS Greater China Team
Information technologies have played a pivotal role in China’s response to the novel coronavirus...
#COVID19 #Coronavirus #2019nCoV #Wuhanvirus #SARScov2 Esaote won a tender launched by Consip on behalf of Civil Protection for the distribution of diagnostic equipment in Italy to face COVID-19 emergency.

Esaote won a tender launched by Consip on behalf of Civil Protection for the distribution of diagnostic equipment in Italy to face COVID-19 emergency.

News | Ultrasound Imaging | April 02, 2020
April 2, 2020 — Esaote, an Italian company among the world leader