News | PET-CT | November 25, 2019

Canon Shows New Digital PET/CT Scanner at RSNA 2019

The Cartesion Prime Digital PET/CT system is comprised of Canon Medical’s new premium SiPM PET detector and the Aquilion Prime SP CT system for optimal PET/CT imaging and workflow with a patient and operator-centric design

November 25, 2019 – At this year’s Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) annual meeting, Canon Medical Systems USA, Inc. is introducing the Cartesion Prime PET/CT system, a new premium Digital PET/CT scanner designed to help health care providers deliver more personalized care.

The Cartesion Prime Digital PET/CT system is comprised of Canon Medical’s new premium SiPM PET detector and the Aquilion Prime SP CT system for optimal PET/CT imaging and workflow with a patient and operator-centric design, along with innovative features to help clinicians guide their business with confidence, including:

  • Advanced silicon photomultiplier design with one-to-one coupling for increased clinical confidence.
  • Fast Time-of-Flight resolution for high quality images and increased productivity.
  • Large axial field of view to provide fast scans and a comfortable experience for patients. The large axial field of view also improves the scanner’s sensitivity which can be used for dose efficiencies that can impact patients and operators.
  • Air-cooling technologies that support more attractive siting and long-term maintenance requirements compared to water-cooled systems.

“With our customers’ needs in mind, we developed the Cartesion Prime Digital PET/CT with advanced features that can help clinicians chart the right course for their patients’ care,” said Tim Nicholson, managing director, Molecular Imaging Business Unit, Canon Medical Systems USA, Inc. “This advanced technology has led to image quality improvements, while optimizing dose efficiency to reduce patient risk and speeding up acquisition time for improved throughput. These innovations are part of Canon Medical’s commitment to continually provide meaningful improvement for today’s care, and for the future.”

Learn more about Canon Medical’s premium Digital PET/CT technology at this year’s RSNA annual meeting in Chicago, Dec. 1 – 6, 2019 (Booth #1933, South Level).

For more information: https://us.medical.canon.

 

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