Melinda Taschetta-Millane, Editorial Director
Melinda Taschetta-Millane, Editorial Director
Blog | Melinda Taschetta-Millane, Editorial Director | Information Technology| April 10, 2017

Finding a Paradigm Shift in Medical Imaging at HIMSS

augmented reality, virtual reality, medical imaging, surgery, Novarad, operating room

An example of augmented reality displays by Novarad at HIMSS 2017. The system uses a visor to project co-registered 3-D datasets on a real patient in an operating room to aid procedural navigation. 

While attending this year’s Health Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) conference in Orlando, ITN editor Dave Fornell found two exciting new technologies that appear to have the potential to become paradigm shifts in medicine. The first is the integration of artificial intelligence into medical imaging IT systems; the second is the use of augmented reality 3-D imaging visors to create a heads-up display of 3-D imaging anatomical reconstructions, or complete computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) datasets surgeons can use in the operating room (OR). 

HIMSS left many, including Dave, feeling energized about the prospects artificial intelligence (AI) may offer medicine. But, unlike the science fiction image that snaps into most peoples’ minds when you talk about AI, it will not be an interactive, highly intelligent robot that will replace doctors. In fact, most users will not even be aware AI is assisting them in the back end of their electronic medical record (EMR) systems. AI is a topic that has been discussed for a few years now at medical conferences, but several concrete examples of how AI will help clinicians significantly reduce time and workflow efficiency were showcased this year at HIMSS. AI will accomplish this by working in the background as an overlay software system that sits on top of the  PACS, specialty reporting systems and medical image archives at a hospital.

The AI algorithms are taught through machine learning to recognize complex patterns and relations of specific types of data that are relevant to the image or disease states being reviewed. 

AI is also making its appearance in business and clinical analytical software, as well as imaging modality software, where it can automatically identify all the organs and anatomy, orientate the images into the standard reading reviews and perform auto-quantification. This is already available on some systems.  

You can read more about Dave’s insights at HIMSS 2017 in his Web-exclusive feature, “How Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging,” at http://bit.ly/2mPbzwF.

You can also watch the video “Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative Technology at HIMSS 2017 at http://bit.ly/2lXBuDm, and take a tour of some of the most innovative new technology that was displayed on the expo floor at HIMSS.

For more information on enterprise imaging from HIMSS, check out “How to  Build an Enterprise Imaging System” at http://bit.ly/2noruU1. Enterprise imaging system expert Louis Lannum was in charge of Cleveland Clinic’s efforts to connect images and other data from 33 of its departments into a single, centralized database that could deliver the content through a viewer in the electronic medical record. He spoke on the key requirements for enterprise imaging systems at HIMSS 2017.

Related Content

Sponsored Content | Webinar | Analytics Software | October 11, 2019
Today’s healthcare providers understand that becoming “data-driven’ is imperative to continued success. In this webinar...
Fujifilm Upgrades Next-Generation Synapse Cardiology PACS
News | Cardiac PACS | October 10, 2019
Fujifilm Medical Systems U.S.A. Inc. recently launched Synapse Cardiology PACS 5.6.1, the company’s next-generation...
As the role of artificial intelligence continues to expand, many companies are making significant investments in this technology to offer solutions
Feature | Artificial Intelligence | October 09, 2019 | By Sharmistha Sarkar
Artificial intelligence (AI) is a technology
Christopher Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, and Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant, discussed how to build the right team to ensure enterprise imaging success

Christopher Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, and Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant, discussed how to build the right team to ensure enterprise imaging success

Feature | Enterprise Imaging | October 09, 2019 | By Jeff Zagoudis
As healthcare enterprise consolidation continues to expand, bringing closer integration between the clinical and oper
RSNA Announces Intracranial Hemorrhage AI Challenge
News | Artificial Intelligence | October 08, 2019
The Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) recently launched its third annual artificial intelligence (AI)...
An illustration of radiology department analytics data showing GE Healthcare's business analytics software.
Feature | Radiology Business | October 08, 2019 | April Wilson
According to IBM, the world creates 2.5 quintillion bytes of data daily.
According to the National Association of County and City Health Officials, only 33 percent of the organizations plan against cybersecurity threats and initiate patient identity protection protocols.

According to the National Association of County and City Health Officials, only 33 percent of the organizations plan against cybersecurity threats and initiate patient identity protection protocols. 

Feature | Cybersecurity | October 08, 2019 | By Maxim Chernyak
As the ...
The National Cybersecurity Center of Excellence (NCCoE) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is releasing a new practice guide — NIST Special Publication 1800-24, Securing Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS)
News | Cybersecurity | October 04, 2019
The National Cybersecurity Center of Excellence (NCCoE) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)
Attendees of ASTRO 2019 walked the halls of McCormick Place in Chicago, Ill.

Attendees of ASTRO 2019 walked the halls of McCormick Place in Chicago, Ill.

Feature | ASTRO | October 03, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
At the American Society for Radiation Oncology’s (ASTRO) 2019 a