News | January 23, 2013

Researchers at RSNA Determine Molecular Breast Imaging Improves Early Detection in High-Risk Women

January 23, 2013 — The Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) Meeting, held annually in Chicago, Ill., is one of the largest and most prestigious medical imaging conferences in the world. Top researchers often choose this venue to announce significant results from their clinical work. One of the most exciting areas of modern medicine discussed at last year's meeting was molecular imaging. Many attendees expressed interest towards a full session dedicated to this new form of imaging entitled, "Breast Imaging in the Era of Molecular Medicine."

Molecular breast imaging (MBI), also commonly referred to as breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI), was a key topic in the dedicated session with more than a third of the lectures examining its role in early breast cancer detection or patient management. MBI can detect breast cancer missed by mammography, according to clinical data presented by Rachel Brem from George Washington University Medical Center. In the work, 364 high-risk patients who had a recent, negative mammogram underwent an MBI examination. In this group, MBI detected breast cancer in nine patients. All cancers were in women with dense breasts.

According to Brem, director of Breast Imaging and vice chair of Radiology at George Washington, "We have long recognized that patients at high-risk for breast malignancy would likely benefit from additional imaging beyond the mammogram. These results indicate that MBI/BSGI could be a very good option for this population; we found breast cancer in 2.5 percent of theses patients who had a recent, negative mammogram. That's pretty impressive and these results are similar to those from the Mayo clinic." She continued, "Although breast MRI is another option, in our practice we find that many patients are unable to have an MRI such as those with pacemakers, claustrophobia, etc., and for others, the cost of an MRI study is simply out of reach. The MBI/BSGI procedure provides us with a low-cost, well tolerated exam that is clearly capable of filling the need for the high-risk group, especially for women who have dense breasts which can make reading the mammogram more difficult."

For more: www.molecularbreastimaging.com

Related Content

Transpara Deep Learning Software Matches Experienced Radiologists in Mammogram Reading
News | Computer-Aided Detection Software | January 12, 2018
Deep learning and artificial intelligence improves the efficiency and accuracy of reading mammograms, according to...
Smartphone Addiction Creates Imbalance in Brain
News | Mobile Devices | January 11, 2018
Researchers have found an imbalance in the brain chemistry of young people addicted to smartphones and the internet,...
Fat Distribution in Women and Men Provides Clues to Heart Attack Risk
News | Women's Health | January 11, 2018
January 11, 2018 – It’s not the amount of fat in your body but where it is stored that may increase your risk for hea
Minimally Invasive Treatment Provides Relief from Back Pain

Lumbar spine MRI showing disc herniation and nerve root at baseline and one month after treatment

News | Interventional Radiology | January 11, 2018
The majority of patients were pain free after receiving a new image-guided pulsed radiofrequency treatment for low back...
Emergency Radiologists See Inner Toll of Opioid Use Disorders

Rates of Imaging Positivity for IV-SUDs Complications. Image courtesy of Efren J. Flores, M.D.

News | Clinical Study | January 11, 2018
January 11, 2018 – Emergency radiologists are seeing a high prevalence of patients with complications related to opio
Study Finds No Evidence that Gadolinium Causes Neurologic Harm

MR images through, A, C, E, basal ganglia and, B, D, F, posterior fossa at level of dentate nucleus. Images are shown for, A, B, control group patient 4, and the, C, D, first and, E, F, last examinations performed in contrast group patient 13. Regions of interest used in quantification of signal intensity are shown as dashed lines for globus pallidus (green), thalamus (blue), dentate nucleus (yellow), and pons (red).

News | Contrast Media | January 11, 2018
January 11, 2018 — There is no evidence that accumulation in the brain of the element gadolinium speeds cognitive dec
CT Shows Enlarged Aortas in Former Pro Football Players

3-D rendering from a cardiac CT dataset demonstrating mild dilation of the ascending aorta.

News | Computed Tomography (CT) | January 11, 2018
Former National Football League (NFL) players are more likely to have enlarged aortas, a condition that may put them at...

Size comparison between 3-D printed prosthesis implant and a penny.

News | 3-D Printing | January 11, 2018
January 11, 2018 — Researchers using...
RSNA 2017 technical exhibits, expo floor, showing new radiology technology advances.
Feature | RSNA 2017 | January 11, 2018
January 11, 2018 — Here is a list of some of the key clinical study presentations, articles on trends and videos from
Hip Steroid Injections Associated with Bone Changes

58-year-old woman with left hip pain. X-ray from one month prior to the steroid/anesthetic injection demonstrates moderate joint space narrowing (arrows) and bony proliferation (arrowheads).

News | Orthopedic Imaging | January 11, 2018
January 11, 2018 – Osteoarthritis patients who received a steroid injection in the hip had a significantly greater in
Overlay Init