News | Treatment Planning | March 08, 2019

Mississippi Cancer Center Combines RayStation and TomoTherapy for Prostate Cancer Case

Collaboration marks first case in U.S. combining the two technologies

Mississippi Cancer Center Combines RayStation and TomoTherapy for Prostate Cancer Case

March 8, 2019 — Anderson Regional Cancer Center in Meridian, Miss., has treated its first patient using the combination of RaySearch's treatment planning system (TPS) RayStation and Accuray's TomoTherapy Treatment Delivery System. This is the first-ever treatment in the U.S. using the two technologies in combination.

Anderson Regional Cancer Center first began using RayStation in 2013 with its conventional linear accelerators, which provided significant benefits for workflow and patient treatments. The center then added the TomoTherapy System for radiation treatment. Anderson has worked closely with RaySearch and Accuray to join the technologies and is now using RayStation for all radiation treatment planning, which is providing substantial gains in efficiency. Additionally, the high-precision treatment delivery provided by the TomoTherapy System will help ensure the best possible radiation treatments for patients.

The first treatment combining RayStation and TomoTherapy System at Anderson Regional Cancer Center was successfully administered to treat a prostate cancer patient. Moving forward, the center plans to use this combination of TPS and radiation treatment delivery system to also treat cancers of the breast, lung, and head and neck.

Scott Anderson, M.D., radiation oncologist and medical director at Anderson Regional Cancer Center, said: "We have watched these progressive companies develop through the years, and we are all very excited to be at this juncture. Integrating RayStation planning for multiple accelerator platforms enables us to fully embrace the TomoTherapy System's advantages. The future of our patients certainly looks brighter with the ability to unify these developments."

Paul King, chief medical physicist at Anderson Regional Cancer Center, said: "This clinical launch is very significant. It is a big step in an evolving story that has just begun, considering the quality of RayStation's design as it is today, as well as the intensity and direction of its ongoing development."

For more information: www.raysearchlabs.com, www.accuray.com

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A set of synthetic CT images created from T1 and T2 weighted MR imaging of a prostate/rectum phantom at Henry Ford Hospital. The hospital is one of the research centers developing  synthetic CT imaging for treatment planning to avoid the need for CT scans of a patient just for treatment planning purposes when they already have a more detailed soft tissue MRI exam of  the anatomy.

A set of synthetic CT images created from T1 and T2 weighted MR imaging of a prostate/rectum phantom at Henry Ford Hospital. The hospital is one of the research centers developing synthetic CT imaging for treatment planning to avoid the need for CT scans of a patient just for treatment planning purposes when they already have a more detailed soft tissue MRI exam of the anatomy.

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