News | Breast Imaging | December 05, 2017

Ikonopedia and Konica Minolta Showcase Integrated Breast Imaging Workflow and Reporting at RSNA

Exa Mammo platform now includes Ikonopedia’s structured reporting system to capture patient data through each step of the exam process

Ikonopedia and Konica Minolta Showcase Integrated Breast Imaging Workflow and Reporting at RSNA

December 5, 2017 — Ikonopedia and Konica Minolta Healthcare Americas Inc. showcased integrated breast imaging workflow and reporting at the 103rd Annual Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting, Nov. 26-Dec. 1 in Chicago.

The two companies have expanded the partnership to integrate both the Opal and Exa healthcare information technology (IT) platforms with Ikonopedia's solution for breast imaging reporting and tracking. The integration with Exa offers a seamless, closed-loop experience with multi-directional functionality and automated follow-up for patients with significant Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) scores. Ikonopedia's solution captures various points of data from the Exa Mammo software to provide a complete patient profile that will result in automatic patient warnings and alerts.

Exa's custom workflow engine design and advanced toolsets make it an ideal solution across a broad array of imaging services, according to Konica Minolta, from the enterprise to specialty-based clinics. The Exa platform is comprised of multiple modules including picture archiving and communication systems (PACS), radiology information systems (RIS), electronic health records (EHRs) and specialty viewers, supporting digital breast tomosynthesis and cardiovascular imaging. The Exa modules can be used together as an integrated solution or individually with a facility's existing software investments. It offers a diagnostic-quality zero footprint universal viewer and vendor neutral archive for DICOM and non-DICOM images; Server-Side Rendering for fast access to large files such as 3-D mammography with no prefetching required, and cybersecurity with no data transferred to or stored on workstations minimizing unwanted exposure to patient data. The Exa Platform was designed to enable each facility to design its own preferred imaging workflow, very simply, with drag and drop tools. The entire step-by-step process can be customized quickly and easily.

The Ikonopedia structured reporting system reliably captures pertinent data to meticulously track patients through each stage of the exam process. The Mammography Quality Standards Act (MQSA)-compliant toolset is targeted and automated to monitor patients in all categories of care. Structured data is captured from multiple locations including resources within Exa, the patient questionnaire, risk-assessment, technologist reporting, physician reporting, follow-up recommendations and more. Data is monitored to produce automatic warnings and alerts, and personalized patient letters along with a detailed report to relay these findings to referring physicians.

Ikonopedia provides reporting tools for screening and diagnostic modalities including mammography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Enhancing Quality Using the Inspection Program (EQUIP) audit data is automatically captured in the background and reports are BI-RADS language-compliant based on the latest BIRADS Atlas (5th edition). Data is pulled forward from previous exams, and risk assessment tools including Tyrer Cuzick automatically alert the radiologist and populate reports for high-risk patients.

For more information: www.konicaminolta.com/medicalusa, www.ikonopedia.com

 

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