News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | February 07, 2017

Blue Earth Diagnostics and Siemens' PETNET Solutions Increase Patient Access to Axumin Injection PET Imaging Agent

Agent for imaging of recurrent prostate cancer will be added to several sites in PETNET’s nationwide network throughout 2017

Blue Earth Diagnostics, Axumin, fluciclovine F-18, recurrent prostate cancer, Simens PETNET Solutions, increased patient access

February 7, 2017 — Blue Earth Diagnostics and Siemens’ PETNET Solutions announced that an increasing number of radiopharmacies will offer Blue Earth Diagnostics’ Axumin (fluciclovine F-18) positron emission tomography (PET) imaging agent through PETNET’s national network.

In June 2016, PETNET Solutions began exclusive commercial production and distribution of Axumin at two sites in the United States, and additional sites have been rolled out in subsequent months. There are now 12 metropolitan locations in the United States offering Axumin, including the recent addition of sites in Phoenix, Ariz., and Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., with more sites planned during 2017. Axumin is a novel molecular imaging agent indicated for use in PET imaging to identify suspected sites of prostate cancer recurrence in men who have elevated blood levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA) following prior treatment. It is the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved F-18 PET imaging agent indicated for use in patients with suspected recurrent prostate cancer.

Blue Earth Diagnostics CEO Jonathan Allis, D.Phil, announced that Axumin reader training is available in collaboration with the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI), including a recent live training event at SNMMI’s Mid-Winter Meeting.

According to Allis, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has granted Axumin transitional pass-through payment reimbursement status using a product-specific Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System (HCPCS) A code (A9588), which became effective Jan. 1 of this year.

Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in men. While most primary prostate cancer can be successfully treated, recurrence occurs in up to one-third of patients. Recurrent disease is typically detected by a rise in PSA levels, but often the location and extent of the disease cannot be detected by conventional imaging. Of those patients who experience biochemical recurrence, approximately one-third go on to develop metastatic prostate cancer.

For more information: www.blueearthdiagnostics.com, www.usa.healthcare.siemens.com/molecular-imaging/petnet-solutions

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