Dave Fornell, ITN Editor
Dave Fornell, ITN Editor

Dave Fornell is the editor of Diagnostic & Interventional Cardiology magazine and assistant editor for Imaging Technology News magazine.

Blog | Dave Fornell, ITN Editor | Computed Tomography (CT) | August 07, 2015

Trends in Cardiovascular CT Imaging

FFR-CT,

An example of FFR-CT, which uses supercomputing algorithms to determine a virtual assessment of hemodynamic flow through all coronary artery segments. 

Here is a recap of some of the top trends and new technology at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2015 annual meeting in Las Vegas.

Watch video Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative News Technology at SCCT 2015

Watch video on key trends from the SCCT President

Last November, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) cleared the use of fractional flow reserve-CT (FFR-CT) software used to noninvasively virtually assess the blood flow through plaque narrowings of coronary vessels to see if the lesions have any hemodynamic significance. This may eliminate the need to perform invasive FFR readings in the cath lab, since the FFR-CT has a close correlation with the catheter-based technology. Catheter FFR is currently the gold standard for assessing the functional significance of lesions and to justify the need for stents. FFR-CT is viewed by many luminaries at SCCT as a potential paradigm shift in how chest pain and cardiac patients will be assessed in the future. This technology was definitely the poster child for SCCT 2015, and the subject of numerous packed sessions.

Watch a video interview on FFR-CT

CT perfusion imaging was also a big topic of discussion, with numerous clinical trials now showing it can offer a more accurate functional assessment of blood flow in the heart without the need for a nuclear exam, stress testing or MRI.

New clinical trial data continue to show the accuracy of patient risk stratification of coronary artery calcium scoring from CT exams. There appeared to be a renewed interest in calcium scoring assessments, which could be used similar to regular mammography exams to monitor cardiovascular disease risk. Data suggest a CT showing no calcium in the coronaries provides a patient with a clean bill of health for at least seven years. Regularly scheduled calcium scans could be used to determine if patients need to be prescribed statins and to monitor non-symptomatic patients with a family history of coronary disease. SCCT also is developing a radiology RADS risk scoring system similar to BI-RADS for breasts or LUNG-RADS for lung cancer assessments to facilitate this type of screening in the future.

Watch a video explaining how calcium scoring may add value to healthcare

Cardiac CT has become the gold standard imaging modality for assessing patients for transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). The CT images also are used for planning treatment, valve sizing, and both multiplanar and 3-D CT images are used to help guide the procedures. TAVR and CT’s roll with increasingly more complex transcatheter structural heart interventions was a major topic of discussion in sessions and on the expo floor. Edward’s Life Sciences, maker of the Sapien TAVR device, exhibited for the first time this CT specialty meeting, driving home the fact that these devices and imaging technologies go hand-in-hand.

Other big topics of discussion included the use of CT as a first line assessment to rule out coronary disease with chest pain patients in the emergency department, the utility of spectral CT imaging and 3-D printing.

Video on the use of CT to assess ED chest pain patients

Video on how 3-D cardiac printing is used at Henry Ford Hospital

 

Related Content

Infervision's newly FDA approved CT lung AI application sets a new standard
News | Artificial Intelligence | July 10, 2020
July 10, 2020 — Infervision announced U.S.
Artificial intelligence (AI)-assisted software was used to identify inflammatory tissues in lung and automatically segment inflammatory lesions. Three-dimensional image shows regions of COVID-19 pneumonia in lung through AI postprocessing. Image courtesy of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

Artificial intelligence (AI)-assisted software was used to identify inflammatory tissues in lung and automatically segment inflammatory lesions. Three-dimensional image shows regions of COVID-19 pneumonia in lung through AI postprocessing. Image courtesy of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | July 10, 2020
July 10, 2020 — An open-access Ameri
A lung CT of a COVID-19 patient, showing ground-glass opacities in the lung from COVID pneumonia. Image courtesy of John Kim.

A lung CT of a COVID-19 patient, showing ground-glass opacities in the lung from COVID pneumonia. Image courtesy of John Kim.

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | July 09, 2020
July 9, 2020 — With increased lung CT exam paradigms being used in the current...
This data represents wave 2 of a QuickPoLL survey conducted in partnership with an imagePRO panel created by The MarkeTech Group (TMTG), regarding the effects of COVID-19 on their business

Getty Images

Feature | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | July 01, 2020 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane
Imaging Artificial Intelligence (AI) provider Qure.ai announced its first US FDA 510(k) clearance for its head CT scan product qER. The US Food and Drug Administration's decision covers four critical abnormalities identified by Qure.ai's emergency room product.
News | Artificial Intelligence | June 30, 2020
June 30, 2020 — Imaging Artificial Intelligence (AI) provider Qure.ai announced its first US FDA 510(k) clearance for
In new QuickPoLL survey on imaging during the pandemic, responses were tallied from around 170 radiology administrators and business managers, who are part of an imagePRO panel created by The MarkeTech Group (TMTG), regarding the effects of COVID-19 on their business. TMTG is a research firm specializing in the medical device, healthcare and pharmaceutical industries.
Feature | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | June 30, 2020 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane
Thoracic findings in a 15-year-old girl with Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C). (a) Chest radiograph on admission shows mild perihilar bronchial wall cuffing. (b) Chest radiograph on the third day of admission demonstrates extensive airspace opacification with a mid and lower zone predominance. (c, d) Contrast-enhanced axial CT chest of the thorax at day 3 shows areas of ground-glass opacification (GGO) and dense airspace consolidation with air bronchograms. (c) This conformed to a mosai

Thoracic findings in a 15-year-old girl with Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C). (a) Chest radiograph on admission shows mild perihilar bronchial wall cuffing. (b) Chest radiograph on the third day of admission demonstrates extensive airspace opacification with a mid and lower zone predominance. (c, d) Contrast-enhanced axial CT chest of the thorax at day 3 shows areas of ground-glass opacification (GGO) and dense airspace consolidation with air bronchograms. (c) This conformed to a mosaic pattern with a bronchocentric distribution to the GGO (white arrow, d) involving both central and peripheral lung parenchyma with pleural effusions (black small arrow, d). image courtesy of Radiological Society of North America

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | June 26, 2020
June 26, 2020 — In recent weeks, a multisystem hyperinflammatory condition has emerged in children in association wit
Researchers from five infectious disease hospitals across four districts in Guangzhou, China found that the less pulmonary consolidation on chest CT, the greater the possibility of negative initial reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) results for 21 patients (nine men, 12 women; age range, 26–90 years)

Comparison of CT features between groups with negative and positive initial RT-PCR results.
aThe difference was statistically significant in comparison of the two groups (p < 0.05).

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | June 18, 2020
June 18, 2020 — 
The thickness of the cartilage covering the end of each bone is colour-coded, with red areas denoting thinner cartilage and green-blue areas denoting thicker cartilage. The technique helps locate where arthritis is affecting the joint over time.

The thickness of the cartilage covering the end of each bone is colour-coded, with red areas denoting thinner cartilage and green-blue areas denoting thicker cartilage. The technique helps locate where arthritis is affecting the joint over time. Image courtesy of the University of Cambridge

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | June 11, 2020
June 11, 2020 — An algorithm that analyzes...
Siemens Partnership will make better health easier throughout Pennsylvania and in all communities that Geisinger serves

Getty Images

News | Radiology Business | June 08, 2020
June 8, 2020 — Siemens Healthineers and Geisinger have estab