News | Interventional Radiology | November 01, 2019

XACT Robotic System Cleared by FDA for Percutaneous Interventional Procedures

The hands-free system combines image-based planning and navigation with instrument insertion and steering to deliver increased procedural accuracy, consistency and efficiency

Harel Gadot

Harel Gadot, Founder, Executive Chairman and President at XACT Robotics says their system’s small footprint and high mobility design will enable care providers to treat a broad range of patient care needs.

November 1, 2019 — XACT Robotics Ltd. announced that its first robotic system was cleared to market in the U.S. by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use during computed tomography (CT) guided percutaneous interventional procedures. XACT’s technology is the first hands-free robotic system combining image-based planning and navigation with insertion and steering of various instruments to a desired target across an array of clinical applications and indications.

“We are committed to redefining the way the entire medical community utilizes robotics, beginning with interventional radiologists,” said Harel Gadot, founder, executive chairman and president, XACT Robotics. “Being the first to introduce a hands-free robotic system, we have the potential to provide significant clinical, technical and economic value while democratizing interventional procedures. Our system’s small footprint and high mobility design will enable care providers to treat a broad range of patient care needs in various clinical sites of service.”  

“The XACT Robotic System provides a unique platform to the interventional radiology community which can help improve the delivery and quality of care for the patients we serve,” said Nahum S. Goldberg, M.D., who is the principal investigator in a multi-site study using the system, which is still an investigational device in Israel. Goldberg is the Head of Interventional Oncology Unit and Director of the Applied Radiology Research Lab at Hadassah Hebrew University Medical Center. “Based on our experience with this unique robotic technology, we can reach very small targets with unprecedented accuracy. Furthermore, this system holds much promise for enabling more efficient use of time and hospital resources.”

The XACT Robotic System is based on research originally conducted at the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, by Prof. Moshe Shoham, founder of Mazor Robotics (acquired by Medtronic in 2018). The Company plans to launch the system to select U.S. radiology Centers of Excellence partners and will debut its technology at the 2019 Radiological Society of North America conference (RSNA) to be held in Chicago, IL on Dec. 1 – 6, 2019 (exhibit booth #1650).

For more information: www.xactrobotics.com/

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