News | Artificial Intelligence | June 13, 2018

Wake Radiology Launches First Installation of EnvoyAI Platform

Platform provides access to over 53 artificial intelligence engines that may be applied to medical imaging studies

Wake Radiology Launches First Installation of EnvoyAI Platform

June 13, 2018 — Artificial intelligence (AI) platform provider EnvoyAI recently completed their first successful customer installation at Wake Radiology in Raleigh, N.C. Wake Radiology is using the platform to provide physicians access to EnvoyAI’s growing marketplace of over 53 AI engines that may be applied to their medical imaging studies. Wake Radiology selected EnvoyAI as the fastest and most comprehensive means to achieving a complete AI strategy for the diverse breadth of clinical services that it provides for patients and referring physicians.

With nearly 50 radiologists, Wake Radiology is now able to experiment with scores of new technologies and has already brought five of the imaging processing engines to pre-production status, with reportedly excellent performance and results. “We realize that AI has great potential to improve healthcare by increasing our efficiency and efficacy as providers. It is important that we embrace the technology early to maximize its effect in our practice and in the lives of our patients. Implementing EnvoyAI gives our physicians an easy and integrated way to begin interacting with the wide variety of algorithms available on the EnvoyAI Exchange from directly within the PACS [picture archiving and communication system] environment. Our radiologists can experiment and immediately apply algorithms that impact their workflow and patient care.” shared Chief Medical Officer William Way, M.D., of Wake Radiology.  

Wake Radiology Chief Information Officer Matt Dewey said, “Wake Radiology has very stringent security requirements. What would have otherwise been a multitude of unacceptable implementation and security challenges resulting from purchasing algorithms separately, has been simplified into a single turn-key platform. We were very impressed with the depth of thought and creativity that went into designing the EnvoyAI security and workflow features. The implementation was seamless and the technical support has been fantastic.”

EnvoyAI said that this initial commercial implementation will be followed quickly by many others around the U.S., which are already underway.  

The company demonstrated the EnvoyAI platform at the Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting, May 31-June 2 in National Harbor, Md.

For more information: www.envoyai.com

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