News | Breast Density | March 26, 2019

Volpara Solutions Expands Relationship With GE Healthcare

GE Healthcare is now a global distributor of VolparaDensity software

Volpara Solutions Expands Relationship With GE Healthcare

March 26, 2019 — Volpara Solutions announced the launch of an expanded agreement enabling the worldwide distribution of its VolparaDensity software by GE Healthcare.

Now installed in more than 35 countries, the VolparaDensity clinical application analyzes mammograms using machine learning to provide radiologists with automated, objective and volumetric breast density assessments. It also provides a breast density category shown to correlate to BI-RADS (Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System) 4th and 5th Editions. VolparaDensity is CE-marked and cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Health Canada and the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA).

Having an objective and validated measure of breast density allows providers to deliver personalized breast care to their patients by easily identifying women with dense breasts. Such women have an increased risk of developing breast cancer and are also at a greater risk of having a cancer go undetected using conventional 2-D and 3-D mammography. Since dense breast tissue and cancer appear white on a mammogram, women with dense breasts may benefit from additional screening such as that delivered by the GE Invenia automated breast ultrasound (ABUS). ABUS has been shown to find small, invasive cancers missed by mammography.

Joseph P. Russo, M.D., section chief of women's imaging at St. Luke's University Health Network in Bethlehem, Pa., said, "There are still certain signs of breast cancer that are best seen on a mammogram, which is why the Invenia ABUS is used in addition to mammography. ABUS screening helps find cancers hiding in dense tissue. Accurate density measurements and quality imaging are very important in breast cancer detection. I encourage women to learn their breast density, understand their risk, and talk to their healthcare providers to get the personalized healthcare they need."

For more information: www.volparasolutions.com, www.gehealthcare.com

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