News | Flat Panel Displays | November 25, 2019

USEI Announces Release of 24-inch Monitors

The monitors will be on display at RSNA

USEI monitor

November 25, 2019 – U.S. Electronics, Inc. (USEI) announces the release of the line of 24-inch monitors in touch (USE-24B23) and non-touch (USE-24B03) versions for the medical market; both also available with a high brightness option. Target applications include modality displays, clinical review and surgical. The key specifications are listed as follows:

  • Screen size 24-inch diagonal
  • Viewing area 518.4 x 324.0 mm
  • Resolution 1,920 x 1,200
  • Viewing angle 89 / 89 / 89 / 89
  • Contrast ratio 1000:1
  • Brightness 400 nits or 900 nits (HB option) with backlight stabilization
  • Inputs VGA, DVI-D and DP
  • Gamma correction DICOM factory preset
  • Regulation CE (EN60601-1 ed3.1, EN60601-1-2 ed4)

Workstations demonstrating these medical imaging solutions will be on display at the annual Radiology Society of North America (RSNA) exhibition, held from Dec. 1-5 at the McCormick Center in Chicago, IL at booth # 1603  (South Hall).

Each workstation will be powered by an HP computer with an NVIDIA P2000 graphics card. USEI also offers XR-VUE imaging software for clinical review of DICOM images and UCAL-350 calibration software capable of calibrating any monitor to DICOM or other gamma curve settings. 

For more information: www.usei.com

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