News | Radiology Business | June 07, 2016

Survey Shows Slight Increase in Radiologic Technologist Wages Since 2013

ASRT data show variations based on discipline, region

ASRT survey, radiologic technologists, wages, 2016

June 7, 2016 — The average salaries of radiologic technologists rose by 4.8 percent in the past three years and now average $65,756, according to the American Society of Radiologic Technologists Wage and Salary Survey 2016.

The survey shows that all radiologic technology disciplines and specialty areas saw average annual increases since 2013, with some areas showing greater gains than others.

“Compared to the 2013 wage and salary survey, the 2016 survey shows fairly consistent gains across all practice areas,” said Myke Kudlas, M.Ed., R.T.(R)(QM), CIIP, associate executive director of learning and membership. “Although this is an improvement, the increase only slightly outpaced inflation over the same time period.”

Radiation therapists experienced the largest average gains at 5.3 percent, from a $78,602 average annual salary in 2013 to $82,798 in 2016. Nuclear medicine technologists followed with a 5.2 percent increase, moving from $72,075 to $75,819. Radiographers experienced a 4.5 percent increase from $53,680 to $56,071. Magnetic resonance imaging technologists saw a 3.9 percent increase from $68,384 to $71,063.

Other increases include sonographers at 3.7 percent, computed tomography technologists at 3.5 percent and mammographers at 3.4 percent.

The disciplines with the highest reported mean compensation were medical dosimetry at $106,777, and registered radiologic assistant/RPA at $100,311.

In addition to wage variations for different practice areas, salaries also fluctuate from region to region, according to the survey. On average, California RTs have the highest annual compensation at $92,396, followed by technologists in the District of Columbia at $81,083. Technologists in Alabama earned the lowest base annual compensation at $52,230.

The survey also highlights RTs’ satisfaction with their compensation. Responses show that nearly half of respondents, 49.4 percent, are either satisfied or very satisfied with their pay. However, 33 percent of respondents said they had not received a raise in the past 12 months.

The ASRT sent questionnaires in February 2016 to all ASRT members with an email address in the 50 states and the District of Columbia. A total of 25,379 radiologic technologists returned completed questionnaires, resulting in a 12.4 percent return rate.

The ASRT conducts the Wage and Salary Survey every three years and has captured longitudinal data since 2004.

For more information: www.asrt.org

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