Technology | Radiology Imaging | July 19, 2016

Siemens Healthineers Introduces Enterprise Services in the U.S.

New business line offers customers expanded transformation and advisory services, asset management services and managed department services

Siemens Healthineers, Enterprise Services, ES, U.S. launch

July 19, 2016 — Siemens Healthineers recently introduced an expanded Services portfolio, known as Enterprise Services (ES), to help U.S. customers enhance the patient care experience, improve population health and reduce the per-capita cost of healthcare. The new business line was introduced at the 24th Annual Health Forum/American Hospital Association (AHA) Leadership Summit, July 17-19 in San Diego.

Previously offered to Siemens Healthineers’ international customers, ES includes expanded transformation and advisory services, asset management services, managed department services and other capabilities. The ES business line will allow hospitals and clinics to share risk with Siemens Healthineers by providing them with optimal technology, equipment management services and clinical workflow solutions.

“With Enterprise Services, Siemens Healthineers ushers in an exciting new era of collaboration with our customers, enabling them to more effectively address budgetary issues and other pressures, and helping them create a first-class clinical environment,” said August Calhoun, PhD, Senior Vice President of Siemens Healthineers Services. “Now, hospitals and clinics are able to focus squarely on their core mission of delivering the highest-quality patient care.”

Recent international examples of the Siemens Healthineers ES offering include a 10-year Managed Equipment Services contract in the United Kingdom that will provide state-of-the-art imaging to 530,000 patients at four sites, and an agreement with a hospital in the Netherlands to operate six new operating rooms beginning in early 2017.

For more information: www.healthcare.siemens.com

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