Technology | Nuclear Imaging | July 16, 2018

Siemens Healthineers Announces FDA Clearance of syngo.via VB30 Molecular Imaging Software

New features bring high-level clinical capabilities to PET imaging in oncology and neurology

Siemens Healthineers Announces FDA Clearance of syngo.via VB30 Molecular Imaging Software

July 16, 2018 — At the 2018 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI), June 23-26 in Philadelphia, Siemens Healthineers announced U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearance of syngo.via VB30 for Molecular Imaging (MI). The latest version of the company’s intelligent imaging software, syngo.via VB30 for MI has new features designed to bring advanced clinical capabilities to positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging in oncology and neurology.

syngo.via VB30 for MI automatically calculates a patient’s Deauville score – an internationally recognized scoring system used by oncologists in the initial staging and evaluation of therapeutic response for patients with Hodgkin lymphoma and most types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. By avoiding the laborious, time-consuming task of manual Deauville score determination, clinicians can save time and increase efficiency.

Also, syngo.via VB30 for MI offers a unique platform for viewing and interpreting parametric PET images. Using dedicated layouts that permit simultaneous visualization of the summed Standard Uptake Values (SUV), the metabolic rate of glucose (MRFDG), and distribution volume images, readers can easily quantify the FDG uptake of these parametric indices.

Additionally, the new platform’s PET/CT and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT hybrid VRT (volume-rendering technique) feature enables 3-D visualization of the disease state in a single image. This feature permits user-friendly interpretation of the cancer relative to anatomical landmarks.

Finally, syngo.via VB30 for MI offers improvements for the quantitative analysis of various neurological conditions via either self-created or widely used databases for various disease states. The assessment of striatal activity in the evaluation of Parkinson’s disease, hypometabolic seizure foci in the evaluation of epilepsy, and amyloid plaque burden in the evaluation of dementia can be conducted quantitatively. This ability provides more information to the reading physician to help increase diagnostic confidence.

For more information: www.usa.healthcare.siemens.com

Related Content

Screening Mammography Could Benefit Men at High Risk of Breast Cancer
News | Mammography | September 18, 2019
Selective mammography screening can provide potentially lifesaving early detection of breast cancer in men who are at...
RefleXion Highlights Novel Approach to Radiotherapy at ASTRO 2019

The RefleXion X1 Machine without the Gantry Cover. The patented technology incorporates PET imaging data, which enables tumors to continuously signal their location. Image courtesy of Reflexion Medical.

News | Radiation Therapy | September 12, 2019
Therapeutic oncology company RefleXion Medical announced it will showcase the RefleXion X1 Machine at the American...
iCAD's ProFound AI Wins Best New Radiology Solution in 2019 MedTech Breakthrough Awards
News | Computer-Aided Detection Software | September 09, 2019
iCAD Inc. announced MedTech Breakthrough, an independent organization that recognizes the top companies and solutions...
Imaging Biometrics and Medical College of Wisconsin Awarded NIH Grant
News | Neuro Imaging | September 09, 2019
Imaging Biometrics LLC (IB), in collaboration with the Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW), has received a $2.75 million...
ASNC Announces Multisocietal Cardiac Amyloidosis Imaging Consensus
News | Cardiac Imaging | September 09, 2019
September 9, 2019 — The American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) published a new expert consensus document along
Neurological Brain Markers Might Detect Risk for Psychotic Disorders

Researchers at the University of Missouri used MRI scans similar to this photo to find neurological markers in the human brain. These markers can be used to detect people at risk for developing psychotic disorders and to understand when this risk has been successfully treated. Image courtesy of Marquette University/John Kerns.

News | Neuro Imaging | September 04, 2019
Help may be on the way for people who might lose contact with reality through a psychotic disorder, such as...
A 3-D printed tungsten pre-clinical X-ray system collimator. 3D printed, additive manufacturing for medical imaging.

A 3-D printed tungsten pre-clinical X-ray system collimator. The tungsten alloy powder is printed into the form desired and is laser fused so it can be machined and finished. Previously, making collimators from Tungsten was labor intensive because it required working with sheets of the metal to create the collimator matrix. 

Feature | Medical 3-D Printing | September 04, 2019 | By Steve Jeffery
In ...
New Radiomics Model Uses Immunohistochemistry to Predict Thyroid Nodules

Workflow of radiomics analysis for IHC indicators. Yellow lines denote area of analysis; red lines denote ROI for radiomic features extraction. X = original image, L = low-pass filter, H = high-pass filter. Image courtesy of Jiabing Gu, et al.

News | Artificial Intelligence | September 03, 2019
Researchers have validated a first-of-its-kind machine learning–based model to evaluate immunohistochemical (IHC)...
A SPECT nuclear scan of the heart to show perfusion defects in the myocardium due to coronary artery blockages or heart attack. The imaging uses the Mo-99 based medical imaging isotope Tc-99m. The U.S. government has created policy to move away from use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) for Mo-99 isotope production, but there is one hold out who has not yet converted before a 2020 deadline. Photo courtesy of Philips Healthcare.

A SPECT nuclear scan of the heart to show perfusion defects in the myocardium due to coronary artery blockages or heart attack. The imaging uses the Mo-99 based medical imaging isotope Tc-99m. The U.S. government has created policy to move away from use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) for Mo-99 isotope production, but there is one holdout who has not yet converted before a 2020 deadline. Photo courtesy of Philips Healthcare.

Feature | Nuclear Imaging | August 30, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor
In a surprising move, the National Institute for Radioelements (IRE) has applied for a new license to export highly e
Delaware Imaging Network Now Offers NeuroQuant Brain Imaging MRI Software
News | Neuro Imaging | August 29, 2019
Delaware Imaging Network (DIN), Delaware’s largest network of outpatient medical imaging centers, has added NeuroQuant...