News | PET Imaging | September 05, 2018

PET Imaging Agent Predicts Brain Tau Pathology, Alzheimer's Diagnosis

Flortaucipir F-18 demonstrates statistically significant sensitivity and specificity for brain changes

PET Imaging Agent Predicts Brain Tau Pathology, Alzheimer's Diagnosis

September 5, 2018 — Eli Lilly and Co. and Avid Radiopharmaceuticals Inc. announced a Phase 3 study of positron emission tomography (PET) imaging agent flortaucipir F-18 met its two primary endpoints, defined as predicting brain tau pathology and predicting Alzheimer's disease diagnosis.

The study, referred to as A16, enrolled a total of 156 end-of-life patients with dementia, mild cognitive impairment or normal cognition who underwent flortaucipir PET imaging. Subsequently, 67 of these patients were evaluated post-mortem. The study met pre-specified endpoints, with flortaucipir demonstrating statistically significant sensitivity and specificity for detecting tau pathology of Braak Stage V/VI, a pathological staging scale for tau neurofibrillary tangles. Flortaucipir also demonstrated statistically significant sensitivity and specificity for detecting a high level of total Alzheimer's disease neuropathologic change (combining both tau and amyloid plaque densities), using the National Institute on Aging and Alzheimer's Association (NIA-AA) neuropathology criteria.

Eli Lilly and Co. plans to disclose more detailed study results at the 2018 Clinical Trials on Alzheimer's Disease (CTAD) meeting, Oct. 24-27 in Barcelona, Spain, and will discuss these findings and potential next steps with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the near future.

For more information: www.lilly.com

Related Content

The interior of the German air force Airbus A-310 Medivac in Cologne, Germany, before its departure to Bergamo, Italy, March 28 to being ferrying COVID-19 patients to Germany for treatment to aid the Italians, whose healthcare system has been overwhelmed by the rapid spread of the coronavirus pandemic. Bundeswehr Photo by Kevin Schrief.

The interior of the German air force Airbus A-310 Medivac in Cologne, Germany, before its departure to Bergamo, Italy, March 28 to being ferrying COVID-19 patients to Germany for treatment to aid the Italians, whose healthcare system has been overwhelmed by the rapid spread of the coronavirus pandemic. Bundeswehr Photo by Kevin Schrief. Find more images from the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Feature | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | April 08, 2020 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane and Dave Fornell
In an effort to keep the imaging field updated on the latest information being released on coronavirus (COVID-19), th
Recommended best practices for nuclear imaging departments under the COVIF-19 pandemic have been issues by the ASNC and SNMMI. #COVID19 #ASNC #SNMMI #Coronavirus #SARScov2
News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | April 03, 2020
April 3, 2020 — A new guidance document on best practices to maintain safety and minimize contamination in nuclear im
#COVID19 #Coronavirus #2019nCoV #Wuhanvirus #SARScov2 New studies use SIRD model to forecast COVID-19 spread; examine patient CT scans to correlate clinical features with mortality

Fig 1. A sample scoring on CT images of a 63-year-old woman from mortality group demonstrated a total score of 63. It was calculated as: for upper zone (A), 3 (consolidation) × 3 (50–75% distribution) × 2 (both right and left lungs) + 2 (ground glass opacity) ×1 (< 25% distribution) × 2 (both right and left lungs); for middle zone (B), 3 (consolidation) × 2 (25–50% distribution) × 2 (both right and left lungs) + 2 (ground glass opacity) × 2 (25–50% distribution) × 2 (both right and left lungs); for lower zone (C), 3 (consolidation) × (2 (25–50% distribution of the right lung) + 3 (50–75% distribution of the left lung)) + 2 (ground glass opacity) × (2 (25–50% distribution of the right lung) + 1 (< 25% distribution of the left lung)) Yuan et al, 2020 (CC BY 4.0)

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | April 01, 2020
April 1, 2020 — A new study, ...
A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute shows an important predictor of PET-CT use

Rustain Morgan, M.D., and colleagues show racial/ethnic disparities in use of important imaging during lung cancer diagnosis. Photo courtesy of University of Colorado Cancer Center

News | PET-CT | March 12, 2020
March 12, 2020 — The use of PET-CT
 “Cyclotrons used in Nuclear Medicine Report & Directory, Edition 2020” that describes close to 1,500 medical cyclotrons worldwide
News | Nuclear Imaging | March 10, 2020
March 10, 2020 — MEDraysintell released its new and unique report “...
SoftVue image stacks of sound speed, as shown for cases ranging across the four Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) breast density categories

Example: SoftVue image stacks of sound speed, as shown for cases ranging across the four Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) breast density categories ((a), fatty; (b), scattered; (c), heterogeneously dense; (d), extremely dense). Note the quantitative scale indicating that absolute measurements are obtained. Image courtesy of MDPI

News | Breast Imaging | March 10, 2020
March 10, 2020 — ...
Schematic depiction of the automated process for assessing fat, muscle, liver, aortic calcification, and bone from original abdominal CT scan data

Figure 1: Depiction of the fully automated CT biomarkers tools used in this study. (A) Schematic depiction of the automated process for assessing fat, muscle, liver, aortic calcification, and bone from original abdominal CT scan data. (B) Case example in an asymptomatic 52-year-old man undergoing CT for colorectal cancer screening. At the time of CT screening, he had a body-mass index of 27·3 and Framingham risk score of 5% (low risk). However, several CT-based metabolic markers were indicative of underlying disease. Multivariate Cox model prediction based on these three CT-based results put the risk of cardiovascular event at 19% within 2 years, at 40% within 5 years, and at 67% within 10 years, and the risk of death at 4% within 2 years, 11% within 5 years, and 27% within 10 years. At longitudinal clinical follow-up, the patient suffered an acute myocardial infarction 3 years after this initial CT and died 12 years after CT at the age of 64 years. (C) Contrast-enhanced CT performed 7 months before death for minor trauma was interpreted as negative but does show significant progression of vascular calcification, visceral fat, and hepatic steatosis. HU=Hounsfield units.

News | Computed Tomography (CT) | March 06, 2020
March 6, 2020 — Researchers at the National Institutes of Health a
M. Minhaj Siddiqui, M.D., associate professor of surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, discusses benefits of MRI-targeted biopsy to more precisely diagnose aggressive prostate cancers

M. Minhaj Siddiqui, M.D., associate professor of surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, discusses benefits of MRI-targeted biopsy to more precisely diagnose aggressive prostate cancers. (c) University of Maryland Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center

News | Prostate Cancer | March 05, 2020
March 5, 2020 — Using a combination of...