News | April 22, 2014

New PET/CT Scanner is More Patient Friendly

April 22, 2014 — Loyola University Medical Center is now offering patients the most advanced positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scanner on the market. The state-of-the-art system is improving the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, heart disease, epilepsy, Alzheimer’s disease and other conditions.

The Philips Gemini TruFlight system merges CT, which shows anatomy, with PET, which shows metabolic activity. The noninvasive exam takes just 15 or 20 minutes. The patient, lying on an open gantry, is never completely enclosed, and can interact with staff.

“It is the most patient-friendly system of its kind,” said Robert Wagner, M.D., medical director, nuclear medicine.

A CT scan combines an array of X-rays to produce a 3-D image. For example, a CT scan can show, in exquisite detail, the structural anatomy of a tumor. The PET scan, in turn, can reveal metabolic “hot spots.” Before the exam, a patient is given a radiopharmaceutical, which is absorbed by organs and tissues that use the most energy. For example, cancer cells, which use more energy than healthy cells, absorb more of the radiopharmaceutical and thus light up the image.

In addition to detecting a tumor, a PET/CT scan can show precisely where it is located, whether it is benign or malignant and whether it has spread. A PET/CT scan also can be used to assess the effectiveness of chemotherapy and determine whether a tumor has recurred.

In cardiovascular patients, a PET/CT scan can determine whether heart muscle damaged in a heart attack is still viable. The scan also can detect cardiac sarcoidosis, an inflammatory disease.

In neurological patients, a PET/CT scan can determine the location in the brain where epileptic seizures are originating. The system also can detect amyloid proteins associated with Alzheimer’s disease.

Many other applications for PET/CT scans are being developed, Wagner said. “We’re just at the tip of the iceberg.”

For more information: www.newswise.com/institutions/newsroom/225/

Related Content

The interior of the German air force Airbus A-310 Medivac in Cologne, Germany, before its departure to Bergamo, Italy, March 28 to being ferrying COVID-19 patients to Germany for treatment to aid the Italians, whose healthcare system has been overwhelmed by the rapid spread of the coronavirus pandemic. Bundeswehr Photo by Kevin Schrief.

The interior of the German air force Airbus A-310 Medivac in Cologne, Germany, before its departure to Bergamo, Italy, March 28 to being ferrying COVID-19 patients to Germany for treatment to aid the Italians, whose healthcare system has been overwhelmed by the rapid spread of the coronavirus pandemic. Bundeswehr Photo by Kevin Schrief. Find more images from the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Feature | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | April 08, 2020 | By Melinda Taschetta-Millane and Dave Fornell
In an effort to keep the imaging field updated on the latest information being released on coronavirus (COVID-19), th
Recommended best practices for nuclear imaging departments under the COVIF-19 pandemic have been issues by the ASNC and SNMMI. #COVID19 #ASNC #SNMMI #Coronavirus #SARScov2
News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | April 03, 2020
April 3, 2020 — A new guidance document on best practices to maintain safety and minimize contamination in nuclear im
Novel scanners may open door for prognostic assessment in patients receiving cochlear implants

Iva Speck, MD, explains research showing that novel, fully digital, high-resolution positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging of small brain stem nuclei can provide clinicians with valuable information concerning the auditory pathway in patients with hearing impairment. The research is featured in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine (read more at http://jnm.snmjournals.org/content/current). Video courtesy of Iva Speck, University Hospital Freiburg, Germany.

News | PET-CT | March 26, 2020
March 26, 2020 — Novel, fully digital, high-resolution...
A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute shows an important predictor of PET-CT use

Rustain Morgan, M.D., and colleagues show racial/ethnic disparities in use of important imaging during lung cancer diagnosis. Photo courtesy of University of Colorado Cancer Center

News | PET-CT | March 12, 2020
March 12, 2020 — The use of PET-CT
 “Cyclotrons used in Nuclear Medicine Report & Directory, Edition 2020” that describes close to 1,500 medical cyclotrons worldwide
News | Nuclear Imaging | March 10, 2020
March 10, 2020 — MEDraysintell released its new and unique report “...
MR Solutions’ dry magnet MRI system for molecular imaging on display at EMIM 2020
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | February 28, 2020
February 28, 2020 — MR Solutions will be displaying its la
Potassium Molybdate Mo 99 Source Vessels for RadioGenix System

Potassium Molybdate Mo 99 Source Vessels for RadioGenix System (Photo: Business Wire)

News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers | February 18, 2020
February 18, 2020 — NorthStar Medical Radioisotopes, LLC, a