News | Enterprise Imaging | June 17, 2019

Konica Minolta Healthcare Introduces New Financing Services Program for Exa Enterprise Imaging

Program designed to provide flexibility for organizations to acquire advanced enterprise imaging IT solutions

Konica Minolta Healthcare Introduces New Financing Services Program for Exa Enterprise Imaging

June 17, 2019 – Konica Minolta Healthcare Americas Inc. announced a new financing services program for the company’s enterprise imaging platform, Exa. Konica Minolta Payment Services is an in-house financing option that provides customers with a one-stop shop for the acquisition of advanced enterprise imaging information technology (IT) solutions. The new service will be introduced at the 2019 Annual Meeting of the Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM), being held June 26-28 in Aurora, Colo.

Designed to provide flexibility in financing, Konica Minolta Payment Services enables customers to adapt their project financing to their current operating model. It eliminates the need for upfront capital payments that can often hinder a facility’s plans to invest in imaging IT. Customers will have several financing options to preserve cash flow, including monthly capital payments. Konica Minolta Healthcare anticipates the new financing services program may also allow for a more defined project scope of work, as well as shorten the lengthy and often cumbersome purchasing time for enterprise imaging, picture archiving and communication system (PACS) and radiology information system (RIS) solutions.

For more information: www.konicaminolta.com/medicalusa

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