News | Computed Tomography (CT) | February 25, 2020

Explore Carestream’s OnSight 3D Extremity System at ECR

Carestream’s state-of-the-art OnSight 3D Extremity System

February 25, 2020 — Carestream’s state-of-the-art OnSight 3D Extremity System (see video link) will be featured at the upcoming European Congress of Radiology (ECR) meeting in Vienna, Austria (Carestream booth #407, Expo X4). The system enables 3-D upper extremity and weight-bearing lower extremity exams, providing affordable and convenient image processing for orthopaedic practices, imaging centers and hospitals at the point of care.

“The OnSight system delivers high-resolution 3-D images with advanced anatomical detail that can help radiologists make more accurate diagnostic decisions and help orthopaedic specialists decide on treatment plans,” said Cyrill Aschenbrenner, business director EMEA – Products and Solutions at Carestream. “It improves the visibility around anatomical hardware like metal screws, plates or nails in the body.”

The CARESTREAM OnSight 3D Extremity System uses cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) technology to capture high-quality images for weight-bearing and other extremity exams that are not possible with traditional CT. Unlike traditional CT systems, the OnSight system has a large-area detector that captures a 3D image of the extremity in a single rotation, which takes only 25 seconds. It employs three X-ray sources to reduce artifacts and improve the overall field of view, capturing the full anatomy of interest in a single scan.  Advanced scatter and metal artifact reduction algorithms improve the visibility of patient anatomy and reduce the distracting in­fluences of metal implants, providing an unobstructed view.

Additionally, the OnSight system can provide high-resolution 3D images that can help reveal subtle or occult fractures and soft-tissue injuries. Surgeons also can study fracture healing over time with accurate images.

“A traditional CT system can be a costly proposition for smaller imaging facilities and orthopaedic practices,” Aschenbrenner said. “OnSight’s small footprint and simplified design cuts the time and cost of installation, and results in productivity gains for imaging centers and hospitals by freeing up full-body CT systems for other exams.”

For more information: www.carestream.com

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