News | Digital Radiography (DR) | November 07, 2019

Carestream Customers Inspire Enhanced Mobile Imaging System

The DRX-Revolution Mobile X-ray System has an improved ergonomic design and user workflow

The Carestream DRX-Revolution Mobile X-ray System provides fast, convenient digital radiography imaging for patients at the bedside, in the operating room, the intensive care unit or the emergency room

In response to customer feedback, Carestream has further developed the DRX-Revolution Mobile X-ray System with an improved ergonomic design and user workflow. The enhanced mobile imaging system will be showcased at Carestream’s booth #7513 at the upcoming Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) annual conference.

The Carestream DRX-Revolution Mobile X-ray System provides fast, convenient digital radiography imaging for patients at the bedside, in the operating room, the intensive care unit or the emergency room. The enhanced system has a lighter, balanced tube head and collimator with responsive display screens located at both the tube head and main display. Technologists now have another point of visibility of the system’s status with new functional LED lighting. In-bin detector charging indicates that the system is always at the ready to be used continuously, from room to room.
“We are continuously redefining the mobile X-ray market by listening to healthcare providers and observing user workflow,” said Sarah Verna, Worldwide Marketing Manager for Global X-ray Solutions at Carestream. “Carestream’s mobile imaging system is the leading revolutionary mobile device in the market: we were the first to develop a device with a collapsible column, allowing the technologist to have complete visibility when transporting the device up and down hallways.”

With the first release of the DRX-Revolution system, Carestream eliminated blind navigation in hallways, elevators and patient rooms. Keeping patients in mind, the system’s brakes and drive motors now are quieter to enable almost noiseless navigation as well. The DRX-Revolution offers unparalleled maneuverability in tight and cluttered spaces in a variety of medical care facilities.

“With the enhanced system, we designed what the customer needs today. For example, we worked on quiet mobility of the system and quiet movement of the tube head,” Verna said. “The quieter hospitals can keep things around the patient, the better healing for the patient. Also, as more people are coming into the hospital with critical diseases and the device needs to be wiped down for each exam, we wanted to make sure that no fluid gets into the system.”

In addition, the device contains higher security features, including the ability to lock detectors and protect against theft. Powered by a wireless DRX Plus Detector that works across other X-ray imaging equipment, the system can be used effortlessly in other mobile units or rooms.

For more information: www.carestream.com

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