News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | March 20, 2019

Book Chapter Reports on Fonar Upright MRI for Hydrocephalus Imaging

Upright MRI scanning is part of Image Guided Atlas Treatment for correcting misalignments at the craniocervical junction

Book Chapter Reports on Fonar Upright MRI for Hydrocephalus Imaging

Rotary misalignment of atlas (C1) and axis (C2). Image courtesy of Scott Rosa, DC, BCAO.

March 20, 2019 — Fonar Corp. reported publication of a chapter where the physician-author-researchers utilized the Fonar Upright Multi-Position MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) system. The title of their chapter is: Craniocervical Junction Syndrome: Anatomy of the Craniocervical and Atlantoaxial Junctions and the Effect of Misalignment on Cerebrospinal Fluid Flow.

The chapter is in a book titled ‘Hydrocephalus - Water on the Brain’ and was published by IntechOpen. The chapter can be found here. The authors are Scott Rosa, DC, BCAO, John W. Baird, M.D., David Harshfield, M.D., and Mahan Chehrenama, M.D.

Rosa said, “The chapter describes how malformations and misalignments of the craniocervical junction (CCJ) can cause a constellation of cerebral and other neurological signs and symptoms collectively called the craniocervical syndrome (CCS). The signs and symptoms of the craniocervical junction syndrome, may be due to mechanical strain causing deformation of dura mater, vasculature and other structures of the cranial vault resulting in irritation of and dysfunction of affected tissues. Deformation of the CCJ may also obstruct blood and CSF flow. Chronic ischemia, edema and hydrocephalus can cause degenerative cascades that can in turn lead to neurodegenerative diseases.”

Rosa has developed a patented method to restore cerebrospinal integrity by correcting misalignments at the craniocervical junction (CCJ). The method is called Image Guided Atlas Treatment (IGAT). He says that the Fonar Upright MRI and its imaging sequences are a critical part of the IGAT methodology in correcting the misalignments found at the CCJ. This is because only the Fonar Upright MRI can visualize the CCJ in the upright, fully weight-loaded position, necessary for detecting fully distended cerebellar tonsillar ectopia and CSF flow impeding vertebral malalignments.

In the future, continued understanding of the CCS may plausibly have a significant impact on the genesis and treatments of the many neurodegenerative diseases that plague mankind. These include multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s Disease), Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and additionally the non neuro-degenerative diseases childhood autism, birth injury and cerebral palsy.

For more information: www.fonar.com

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