Melinda Taschetta-Millane, Editorial Director
Melinda Taschetta-Millane, Editorial Director
Blog | Melinda Taschetta-Millane, Editorial Director | RSNA 2016 | November 01, 2016

Take a Look Beyond Imaging at RSNA

Chicago, bean, RSNA

The theme for this year’s Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 102nd Annual Meeting and Scientific Assembly is “Beyond Imaging.” This year’s conference invites radiologists to explore new ways to collaborate and envision their field beyond just imaging. The meeting will take place Nov. 27-Dec. 2, 2016, at McCormick Place in Chicago.  

In case you can’t make it to Chicago, this year’s Virtual Meeting features 25 percent more content, extended access and CME credit for live sessions in addition to 13 CME-eligible courses on demand. Extended access to the on-demand programming runs through Dec. 23 at 4 p.m. CST. However, if you do plan to attend, this year’s event will host more than 50,000 attendees from around the globe. The meeting will feature breaking news from more than a dozen scientific press conferences, and approximately 3,000 scientific presentations and posters covering the latest trends in radiologic research.

“The RSNA 2016 Scientific Program offers a diverse selection of innovative and cutting-edge research from around the world,” said Jon A. Jacobson, M.D., chair of the RSNA Scientific Program Committee. “The quality of this year’s presentations is exceptional, representing submissions from the national and international scientific community.”

If you are making the trek to the Midwest, use the RSNA FastPass to help with your pre-plans for the meeting. The FastPass can be found at www.rsnafastpass.com, and features many of the new systems and products being introduced on this year’s show floor. Some of these systems are also featured in this issue beginning on page 27, in the RSNA Show Preview section.

Be sure to visit the ITN team in the South Hall, booth 3201. We will be showcasing our recent Technology Reports and Stereotactic Breast Biopsy Procedures Roundtable Discussion videos in the booth, as well as the October and November/December issues of ITN and much more. Our editorial team invites you to stop by the booth and chat with us about the new technologies and procedures that you are experiencing at RSNA. We’d also like to hear more about your interests, goals and concerns as we head into a new year. What will you be doing that is beyond imaging? What are the challenges you will be facing, and how are you planning to overcome these obstacles? As a reader-driven publication, it is our ultimate goal to provide you with the information you need to remain competitive and informed in the industry ...
we want your feedback.

The entire ITN team is looking forward to taking a look at future technologies … and delving into what lies beyond imaging. We will see you in Chicago!

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