News | Pediatric Imaging | October 29, 2019

3-D Full Body Imaging Offered at Miller Children’s & Women’s Hospital Long Beach

EOS is an innovative 2-D/3-D imaging system that results in 2-3x less radiation exposure for kids with orthopedic conditions like scoliosis

EOS is a device that captures bi-planar images with two perpendicular X-ray beams that travel vertically while scanning the patient from head to toe

October 29, 2019 — MemorialCare Miller Children's & Women's Hospital Long Beach is now the only children's hospital from the South Bay to Orange County to offer the EOS Imaging System, the first technology capable of providing full-body, 2-D and 3-D images of pediatric patients in a standing position at a low dose of radiation

EOS is a device that captures bi-planar images with two perpendicular X-ray beams that travel vertically while scanning the patient from head to toe. In less than 20 seconds, the EOS exam produces simultaneous frontal and lateral, low dose images. The two resulting digital images are processed by EOS' proprietary sterEOS software to generate a 3-D model of the patient's spine and/or lower limbs. These detailed images with only 20 seconds of radiation were previously unachievable before EOS technology.

The benefits of EOS include highly detailed information about the patient's unique anatomy to better assist the orthopedic surgeons at Miller Children's & Women's as they diagnose patients. This additional data can be used for precise, 3-D surgical planning to help improve overall patient outcomes by developing a customized surgical plan.

EOS can be used for children with hip, knee or spine conditions. Because of the lower dose of radiation, it is ideal for children who require multiple X-rays during the course of their treatment, such as patients with scoliosis.

"Traditional X-rays have been the primary diagnostic tool to detect spine deformities, especially in scoliosis and kyphosis," said Torin Cunningham, M.D., medical director, Orthopedic Center, Miller Children's & Women's. "Now with EOS, our patients will get two to three times less radiation than a standard X-ray while providing us with extremely detailed, high-quality images."

The EOS exam uses a radiation dose that is "As Low As Reasonably Achievable" (ALARA). ALARA is a term used by the medical community to refer to a safety principle for minimizing radiation doses and the release of radioactive materials by employing all reasonable methods.

"The full body, weight-bearing images and 3-D models improve the level of understanding of the patient's condition, so we can provide enhanced orthopedic care," said Cunningham. "We are very excited to bring this safe and innovative technology to our patients and community."

Miller Children's & Women's has a leading orthopedic center that cares for children from birth to 21-years-of-age with developmental disorders, congenital, neuromuscular and post-traumatic problems of the musculoskeletal system.

The orthopedic center has programs in a wide range of orthopedic specialties for growing children and teens, including the only spinal deformities program in Long Beach and one of only four in Southern California.

For more information: http://www.eospledge.com/

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