Feature | Breast Imaging | December 29, 2015

Ultrasound Breast Cancer Detection Rate Comparable To Mammography

Study also finds there was a greater proportion of invasive and node-negative cancers in those who had ultrasound

Breast ultrasound, ABUS

December 29, 2015 - The use of ultrasound (US) in detecting breast cancer has been shown to be comparable in its sensitivity to that of mammography and should be considered when testing for the disease according to a study published Dec. 28 in the JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

The number of breast cancers is increasing across the globe, with over 1.6 million new cases of the disease in 2010, resulting in the deaths of over 425,000 women.  Additionally, 2.1 million new breast cancer cases are expected by 2030.  While mammography is an effective method in detecting breast cancer in developed countries, it is not commonly available in less developed nations, and alternative methods, such as ultrasound, need to be tested.

To determine the effectiveness of using ultrasound to detect breast cancer, Wendie A. Berg, M.D., Ph.D., Department of Radiology, Magee-Womens Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pa., and colleagues recruited 2,809 women across 20 different sites in the United States, Canada, and Argentina to the American College of Radiology Imaging Network protocol 6666 breast cancer screening study.  Of the participants, 2,662 completed three annual breast screenings by US and film-screen or digital mammography, and then had a biopsy or a 12-month follow-up.

The researchers found that the number of US screens to detect breast cancer was comparable to that of mammography, and found that there was a greater proportion of invasive and node-negative cancers in those who had US; however, there was also a greater number of false-positives among the women screened with US. While the false-positive rate of US exceeds that of mammography, the number of women recalled for extra testing becomes more comparable on incidence screening rounds, the authors write.  

“Where mammography is available, US should be seen as a supplemental test for women with dense breasts who do not meet high-risk criteria for screening MRI and for high-risk women with dense breasts who are unable to tolerate MRI,” Berg said.

For more information: www.oxfordjournals.org/our_journals/jnci/press_releases/bergdjv367.pdf

Related Content

FDA Clears Koios DS Breast 2.0 AI-based Software
News | Ultrasound Women's Health | July 11, 2019
Koios Medical announced its second 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).
360 Photos | Ultrasound Imaging | July 11, 2019
This 360 degree photo shows a basic, point-of-care cardiac echocardiogram being performed using a smartphone turned i
SimonMed Imaging Implements ProFound AI for 3-D Tomosynthesis
News | Mammography | July 10, 2019
Arizona-based SimonMed Imaging announced their implementation of the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-...
360 Photos | Ultrasound Imaging | July 09, 2019
A view of a mitral valve on a GE Healthcare Vivid E95 ...
360 Photos | Ultrasound Imaging | July 08, 2019
This is a 360 degree view of a live cardiac echo demonstration for the Siemens Healthineers Acuson SC2000...
Delta T1 Maps Provide Quantitative, Automated Solution to Assess Brain Tumor Burden
News | Neuro Imaging | July 05, 2019
Imaging Biometrics LLC (IB) a subsidiary of IQ-AI Ltd., is highlighting a recently published study in the American...
Therapixel Appoints Matthieu Leclerc-Chalvet as CEO
News | Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019
Artificial intelligence (AI) breast cancer screening specialist Therapixel announced the appointment of Matthieu...
GE Healthcare showcases Senographe Pristina Serena featuring its add-on-biopsy kit at the Breast Imaging Symposium. Photo by Greg Freiherr

GE Healthcare showcases Senographe Pristina Serena featuring its add-on-biopsy kit at the Breast Imaging Symposium. Photo by Greg Freiherr

Feature | Breast Imaging | July 03, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
Productivity and its enabler — efficiency — guided the display of products at the April...
Countless possibilities can impact the future of global healthcare and AI is the first step toward breakthrough that will change the landscape of personalized medicine
Feature | Women's Health | July 03, 2019 | By Samir Parikh
Contrary to what many people believe,...

Image courtesy of GE Healthcare

Feature | Radiology Business | July 03, 2019 | By Jeffrey Hoffmeister, M.D.
Burnout in the medical profession is not uncommon, particularly as clinicians have become more overwhelmed by growing