Feature | February 06, 2014

Photon-Counting Technique Increases Detection Rate in Screening Mammography

Mammography Systems Women's Health Clinical Study DR CR Radiation Dose

This shows two-view screening mammograms obtained with the DR photon-counting system show a spiculated mass in the right upper quadrants (arrow). The diagnosis was invasive ductal carcinoma, 8 mm in diameter, as seen on the (a) right craniocaudal image, (b) right mediolateral oblique image, and (c) zoomed in craniocaudal image of the lesion.

Mammography Systems Women's Health Clinical Study DR CR Radiation Dose

Two-view screening mammograms obtained with the DR photoncounting system show an indistinct mass in the left lower outer quadrant (arrow). The diagnosis was invasive ductal carcinoma, 7 mm in diameter, as seen on the (a) left craniocaudal image, (b) left mediolateral oblique image, and (c) zoomed in craniocaudal image of the lesion.

Mammography Systems Women's Health Clinical Study DR CR Radiation Dose

Two-view screening mammograms obtained with the DR photoncounting system show pleomorphic calcifications in a linear distribution in the right upper quadrants (arrow). The diagnosis was DCIS, as depicted on the (a) right craniocaudal image, (b) right mediolateral oblique image, and (c) zoomed in craniocaudal image of the lesion.

February 6, 2014 — Digital mammography screening with photon-counting technique offers high diagnostic performance, according to a study published online in the journal Radiology.
 
As mammography screening has shifted to digital technology, a range of computed radiography (CR) and direct radiography (DR) systems have emerged. The photon-counting technique is a DR approach that uses a detector to decrease scattered radiation and noise, enabling dose reduction.
 
"In population-based mammography screening, dose reducing techniques that don't compromise outcome parameters are desirable," said Walter Heindel, M.D., department of clinical radiology at the University Hospital Muenster in Muenster, Germany.
 
For the study, Heindel and colleagues analyzed data from the mammography screening program in North Rhine-Westphalia, the most populous state in Germany. They compared the screening performance of a DR photon-counting scan system with those of statewide operating screening units using different digital technologies. During the study period (2009 to 2010), 13,312 women were examined using the photon-counting system, and 993,822 women were screened with either CR or DR systems alone.
 
The DR photon-counting scan system had a cancer detection rate of 0.76 percent for subsequent screening, compared with 0.59 percent for the other screening units. The recall rate was 5.4 percent for the photon-counting method and 3.4 percent for the other methods.
 
"The higher cancer detection resulting from the use of the DR photon-counting scan system is due to high detection of both small, invasive cancers and ductal carcinoma in situ," Heindel said.
 
The photon-counting technique had almost twice the detection rate of other methods for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), an early, noninvasive form of disease. It had a higher DCIS detection rate than the statewide units and the conventional DR subgroup.
 
In addition, the mean average glandular radiation dose of the DR photon-counting scan system was significantly lower than the conventional DR systems with the individually used parameters of the automatic exposure control.
 
The photon-counting technique also offers lateral dose modulation during the image acquisition, which can help account for differences in breast density. 
 
"One future research direction is the application of spectral imaging for quantification of breast glandular tissue, addressing the problem of breast density," Heindel said.
 
For more information: pubs.rsna.org/journal/radiology

Related Content

physical fitness, brain size, Neurology journal, MRI study
News | Neuro Imaging | February 11, 2016
February 11, 2016 — Poor physical fitness in middle age may be linked to a smaller brain size 20 years later, accordi
ultrasound-activated microbubbles, heart attack, pig model, NIBIB, human clinical trials

An ultrasound-stimulated microbubble burrows through a fibrin clot (green) allowing penetration of the surrounding fluid into the clot (yellow). Image courtesy of Christopher Acconci and David Goertz, University of Toronto.

News | Ultrasound Imaging | February 11, 2016
Researchers funded by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) used ultrasound-activated...
radiation therapy, missing appointments, cancer recurrence, Montefiore Medical Center
News | Radiation Therapy | February 10, 2016
February 10, 2016 — Cancer patients who miss two or more...
Carestream, OnSight cone beam CT scanner, orthopedic imaging, HUS Medical Imaging Center Finland
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | February 09, 2016
HUS Medical Imaging Center in Helsinki, Finland, is undertaking the first European clinical test study of the new...
radiation therapy, head and neck cancers, HPV status, UCLA study
News | Radiation Therapy | February 09, 2016
Head and neck cancers that test positive for the herpes papilloma virus (HPV) are known to respond more favorably to...
second language, brain connection strength, resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging, fMRI study, Journal of Neuroscience
News | Neuro Imaging | February 08, 2016
Learning a second language is easier for some adults than others, and innate differences in how the various parts of...
Harvard Women's Health Watch, USPSTF mammography guidelines
News | Mammography | February 05, 2016
The January 2015 Harvard Women’s Health Watch discusses the new mammography guidelines from the U.S. Preventive...
News | Neuro Imaging | February 05, 2016
New research may allow more effective and safer pain medications to reach patients who suffer from chronic pain sooner...
medical imaging, low-dose radiation, cancer, LNT model study
News | Radiation Dose Management | February 04, 2016
The widespread belief that radiation from X rays, CT scans and other medical imaging can cause cancer is based on an...
multiple sclerosis, MS, T2-weighted MRI, University of Nottingham study
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | February 03, 2016
February 3, 2016 — A new way of using...
Overlay Init